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I recently encountered what I believe was a bug in a LaTeX package I was using. After losing a few hours on the issue1, I noticed that the documentation was updated after TeX Live 2015. I tried my luck updating the package2 with TeX Live Utility.app, and the issue disappeared.

If I ever encounter such an issue in the future, is there some place where I can check if it is a known bug or if it was fixed in an update?


  1. According to my data, such issues most likely originate somewhere between my chair and my keyboard.
  2. Actually, every package.
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    No. LaTeX packages are contributed by an enormous number of different people. There are bug trackers for some individual packages and for core stuff, but many packages have no bug tracker and there is no single place to look. You just look in the package's documentation or see if it has been updated with tlmgr or on CTAN.
    – cfr
    Commented May 1, 2016 at 1:58
  • @cfr Shouldn’t this be an answer? ;-)
    – Édouard
    Commented May 1, 2016 at 3:26
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    You can subscribe to the comp.tex.ctan.announce feed to pick up any package updates that are announced. These usually come with a brief summary of changes, but not all updates are announced. The CTAN package upload form has an option to skip the announcement if the change is only minor. Commented May 1, 2016 at 11:10
  • @NicolaTalbot 's is better, don't you think?
    – cfr
    Commented May 1, 2016 at 16:24
  • @cfr Perhaps combine both comments into an answer? You got in with your comment first, so I don't mind if you merge my comment in with your answer :-) Commented May 1, 2016 at 19:04

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No. That is, if you mean a single place, such as a bug tracker, where you can check for known issues and lists of changes in all LaTeX packages in TeX Live, then there is no such place.

LaTeX packages are contributed by an enormous number of different people. There are bug trackers for some individual packages and for core stuff, but many packages have no bug tracker and there is no single place to look.

If you suspect a bug in a particular package, the best place to look for information is in the package's documentation. The best way to check for updates in general is to use tlmgr.

When TeX Live is 'frozen' pending a new release, it is also worth looking on CTAN as updates there will not be incorporated into TeX Live until the new version is released, but can be downloaded manually for an emergency fix. For example, TeX Live 2015 is frozen forever but TeX Live 2016 is not yet released for general use. It is, therefore, worth checking CTAN for updates if you have problems with a package as bug fixes will not be available in TeX Live until the 2016 version is released.

[Obviously, this may not apply if you are pretesting TL 2016, but, in that case, you probably have bigger bugs to worry about and should be subscribed to the relevant mailing list.]

You can subscribe to CTAN's mailing list to receive announcements concerning package additions and updates. Alternatively, as Nicola pointed out, you can subscribe to an RSS feed such as gmane.comp.tex.ctan.announce or ctan-ann for the same purpose. See this CTAN page for further details, including links to archived messages which may be searched for past announcements of possible relevance.

When new packages are uploaded or existing packages are updated, they are typically announced to the list and these announcements generally list major changes and bug fixes. However, as Nicola said, authors may opt out of the announcement if they consider the update minor. Moreover, announcements summarise major changes and do not list everything. Their content is determined by the package author and authors may disagree about what constitutes a major or minor change!

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  • Good idea mentioning the annual TL freeze. I'd forgotten about that. :-) Commented May 1, 2016 at 22:29

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