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I am working on a college presentation and I'd like to include some graphics into my latex baposter.

The graphics is eps free file, similar to the below: http://freedesignfile.com/552-hand-draw-flower-vector-02/

For example, if I choose the above file, I need to display each flower separately in different sections of my poster. I tried trimming the image (like Crop an inserted image?), but it does not give good results.

Extremely appreciate any tips on how to go about this from within latex or some free graphics program.

  • 2
    Inkscape can edit encapsulated postcript files. Not trivial, but the tutorials are good. – Rmano May 6 '16 at 19:07
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    Are you using pdflatex ? Have you epstopdf ? Work trim & clip with with png, jpg or pdf files ? – Fran May 6 '16 at 19:08
  • Thanks for comments. I have used eps2pdf to convert the image to pdf and then tried cropping the image by trim command in latex, but did not get good results. I am using TexNicCenter. – Melanie A May 7 '16 at 2:21
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At the top of an eps file, you will find the bounding box, a sequence of four numbers which define the left, lower, right and upper edges of the image (in that order). In this masterpiece, the bounding box is 0 0 200 200.

%!PS-Adobe-2.0 EPSF-2.0
%%Title: pumpkin.eps
%%BoundingBox: 0 0 200 200
/tri {newpath 0 0 moveto 10 0 lineto 0 20 lineto -10 0 lineto closepath fill} bind def
1.0 0.6 0.25 setrgbcolor
1 setlinewidth
100 100 100 0 360 arc gsave stroke grestore fill
0 0 0 setrgbcolor 
100 90 60 190 350 arc stroke
100 100 translate tri
-50 40 translate tri
100 0 translate tri
showpage
%EOF

Using optional arguments to \includegraphics*, you can define a viewing window, which can be different to the bounding box. The example below displays the upper right corner and the centre of the image.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{graphicx}
\begin{document}
\centering
\includegraphics*[100,100][200,200]{pumpkin}
\quad
\includegraphics*[050,050][150,150]{pumpkin}
\end{document}

crop

However, this doesn't work with pdflatex. To get around this, make a copy of the eps file and change the bounding box there before converting to pdf.

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