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I am looking how to rotate a page in my document. I already used landscape, but unfortunately it rotates also the pdf page. I just would like to see the text rotate with a vertical pdf page. Is there someone that could help me?


Edit: For instance, this is the code that I am developing and the pdf plot. As you can see the pdf page is rotate and the text with the matrix is horizontal. I would like to have the page pdf vertical and the text horizontal. The reasons are because I prefer like this and I do not want to scale the matrices. Is it possible to keep the pdf page vertical and rotate the text? I already tried rotate but it does not work.

Best regards, and sorry if I am not being enough precise on it.

Current Code

\documentclass[smallextended]{svjour3}       % onecolumn (second format)
\usepackage[paperwidth=165mm, paperheight=238mm, left=2.5cm,right=2cm,top=2cm,bottom=2cm]{geometry}

\smartqed  % flush right qed marks, e.g. at end of proof
%
\usepackage[graphicx]{realboxes}
\usepackage{graphicx}
\usepackage{epstopdf}
\usepackage{lineno}
\linenumbers
\usepackage{amsmath}

\journalname{Energy Efficiency}
\usepackage{amssymb}
\usepackage[justification=centering]{caption}

\usepackage{pdflscape}
\usepackage{nomencl}
\makenomenclature


\begin{document}
    \begin{landscape}

    \section{APPENDIX}
    \label{sec:5}
    Here below the matrices

    \newcommand*{\Scale}[2][4]{\scalebox{#1}{$#2$}}%

    \[\Scale[0.85]{
    $$
    \begin{bmatrix}
        0   \\
        0   \\
        0   \\
        ... \\
        0   \\
        0
    \end{bmatrix}^{v+1}
    \quad
    =
    \begin{bmatrix}
        0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   \\
        0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   \\
        0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   \\
        ... & ... & ... & ... & ... & ... & ... & ... & ... \\
        0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   \\
        0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0
    \end{bmatrix}^{inv}
    \quad
    \begin{bmatrix}
        0   \\
        0   \\
        0   \\
        ... \\
        0   \\
        0
    \end{bmatrix}^{v}
    \quad
    +
    \begin{bmatrix}
        0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   \\
        0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   \\
        0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   \\
        ... & ... & ... & ... & ... & ... & ... & ... & ... \\
        0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   \\
        0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0
    \end{bmatrix}^{inv}
    \quad
    \begin{bmatrix}
        0   \\
        0   \\
        0   \\
        ... \\
        0   \\
        0
    \end{bmatrix}^{v}
    $$
    }
    \]
    \end{landscape}
\end{document}

Current Output

Current Output

  • 1
    Hang on: you want the PDF to display on screen as a vertical page that has text rotated 90 degrees? Why would you want that? Please be more clear exactly what you want to do and how it differs from what has been asked before. – Willie Wong May 24 '16 at 14:40
  • In particular, does the lscape package do what you need? It emphatically misses the PDF rotate feature; for that you would need to use the enhanced version. – Willie Wong May 24 '16 at 14:41
  • Hi, I have some long matrices, that s why I want to rotate the text, but the page should stay vertical. – chrisis May 24 '16 at 14:58
  • It is still not clear what you meant. (1) Why should the page not be horizontal? Do you really expect your readers to turn his/her head when reading on the computer screen? (2) By long matrices, do you mean many rows or many columns? (3) If you find it hard to express what you want, try including in your question the code you are trying to compile and a simple illustration of the desired output. (You can even draw a simple picture in Microsoft Paint and include in the question body.) – Willie Wong May 24 '16 at 18:20
  • Your question leaves all the effort to our community, even typing the essentials of a TeX document such as \documentclass{}...\begin{document} etc. As it is, most of our users will be very reluctant to touch your question, and you are left to the mercy of our procrastination team who are very few in number and very picky about selecting questions. You can improve your question by adding a minimal working example (MWE) that more users can copy/paste onto their systems to work on. If no hero takes the challenge we might have to close your question. – Reinstate Monica - M. Schröder May 25 '16 at 5:21
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This answer makes use of the graphicx package and its \rotatebox command. The MWE below also makes use of the more common \documentclass{article} for a wider audience with TeX.SE users.

N.B. This is untested with the \documentclass{svjour3} and other code from the MWE in your question. But I do not see any reason as to why it should fail.

Rotated Matrix (MWE)

\documentclass[a4paper]{article}
\usepackage{amsmath, amssymb}

\usepackage[justification=centering]{caption}
\usepackage{graphicx}   

\begin{document}

    \section{APPENDIX}
    \label{sec:5}
    \par Here below the matrices.

    \vspace{1em}
    \par\noindent\begin{minipage}{\linewidth}
        \centering
        \rotatebox{-90}{
            \begin{minipage}{0.8\textheight}
                \vspace*{\fill}
                \footnotesize
                \[
                \begin{bmatrix}
                    0   \\
                    0   \\
                    0   \\
                    ... \\
                    0   \\
                    0
                \end{bmatrix}^{v+1}
                \quad
                =
                \begin{bmatrix}
                    0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   \\
                    0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   \\
                    0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   \\
                    ... & ... & ... & ... & ... & ... & ... & ... & ... \\
                    0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   \\
                    0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0
                \end{bmatrix}^{inv}
                \quad
                \begin{bmatrix}
                    0   \\
                    0   \\
                    0   \\
                    ... \\
                    0   \\
                    0
                \end{bmatrix}^{v}
                \quad
                +
                \begin{bmatrix}
                    0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   \\
                    0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   \\
                    0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   \\
                    ... & ... & ... & ... & ... & ... & ... & ... & ... \\
                    0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   \\
                    0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0   & 0
                \end{bmatrix}^{inv}
                \quad
                \begin{bmatrix}
                    0   \\
                    0   \\
                    0   \\
                    ... \\
                    0   \\
                    0
                \end{bmatrix}^{v}
                \]
                \vspace*{\fill}
            \end{minipage}
        }
        \captionof{figure}{Some Matrix}
        \label{eq:somematrix}
    \end{minipage}
\end{document}

P.S. Note the useful shorthand declaration of the math packages. \usepackage{amsmath, amssymb}

Notes

  • Requires \usepackage{graphicx} for the main purpose
  • Requires \usepackage{caption} for the MWE's caption in the minipage environment
  • \par\noindent and \vspace*{\fill} fixes horizontal alignment issues
  • \footnotesize is optional. Used for demonstration only.
  • Make use of TeX IDEs and their alignment features. Such as TeXStudio's table cell alignment feature (a remnant of cleaning your MWE earlier) which gives properly aligned columns in matrices and tables.
  • The minipage environment in the \rotatebox command has it's height set and not it's width. So use \textheight instead.
  • 1
    Yeah, just move the text from where it is to inside the \begin{minipage}{0.8\textheight} environment after the \vspace*{\fill}. Don't forget you can also change 0.8\textheight to whatever you need to. – samthecodingman May 25 '16 at 10:37
  • Thanks it works. the problem that now the page is adjacent to the top side of the page and i would like to move the text on the left bottom corner of the page. – chrisis May 25 '16 at 10:38
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To explain better the problem I post the pdf. I would like that the text would be on the bottom left corner of the page. Instead, the text is on the top side of the page. I am trying to move it down, I deleted \centering and I tried also other options I set \hspace*{3 cm} but nothing change. Could you help me please?

enter image description here

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