5

So I've already got my book ready set for a6 paper: contents, latex compilation, and I'm already satisfied with the end result of pdf I've got. However I've noticed that it'd be good to add a small margin/offset binding to the left/inner side to have more space to glue/bind it all together.

Setting margins in the latex compilation would, even slightly, change the resulting pdf. I'm trying to avoid that step. ...Although one of the comments has already fixed that!! So a short answer/solution would be that comment suggested by touhami!

\addtolength\oddsidemargin{1cm} \addtolength\evensidemargin{-1cm}

The problem may be rather similar to insert pdf, add margin, or even a unpopular/unanswered question on margin width. This is one of the topics I've noticed most clogged with low qualified questions and answers. Is it possible to find a canonic solution?

I can't manage to give the margin on only one side from the done pdf. So the question is rather simple and even universal I hope:

Is it possible to place only a 1 cm margin on one side of a ready pdf?

(with an a6paper as end result)

Maybe a possible solution would most likely be similar to this post on what to do with a ready pdf to send it to print.


So I got answers and realized some important shit regarding margins offset/scaling.

If you get an offset margin in any size of paper, you'll get a scaled page, and you'll need to cut off the upper and lower margin so that the text doesn't get out of proportion.

  • Nota bene. It seems it's best practice to go back to the book, before compilation, and set the outset there: this way it's possible to avoid using an exacto knife massively. ...Also I'm sorry to admit that this whole question is a paradox. However, two answers dealed awesome with possible responses: Werner, on one hand, showed what the question was intending to do, and this brought the awareness of paradox. ph0t0nix, on the other hand, showed the new path that is needed, even if by surprise.
  • It would be good to have a minimal working example. Does adding \usepackage[lmargin=1truecm]{geometry} to your document do what you want? – Andrew May 27 '16 at 4:14
  • Thanks for quick response @Andrew! I have my book ready, how c/would I post a mwe? The text includes some watermarks, so you're proposed solution doesn't work well in combination. Plus I'd like to keep proportions of pages as are and avoid changing the amount of pages. Again, I appreciate the reach. Just figures it's a simple situation that I see all around this site and no straight-forward solution around. – nilon May 27 '16 at 4:49
  • 2
    try add \addtolength\oddsidemargin{1cm} \addtolength\evensidemargin{-1cm} – touhami May 27 '16 at 5:28
  • @touhami I'm sorry for others, and actually very much surprised to say that your solution pretty much did the trick!!!! – nilon May 27 '16 at 6:05
10

Let's create a bunch of random text:

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[margin=15mm,paper=a6paper]{geometry}
\usepackage{lipsum}
\begin{document}
\sloppy\lipsum[1-50]
\end{document}

We'll call this work-of-art lipsum50.pdf. It consist of 25 pages of pure awesomeness, all of which is laid out on A6 paper with a 15mm margin. This should replicate your 130 page document.

Now we want to add an inner margin of (say) 1cm. That is, we need to place each page on the outside of pages that have an additional 1cm across the horizontal. The dimensions of A6 is 105mm x 148mm, so we'll set out paper size to be 115mm x 148mm.

We include lipsum50.pdf using pdfpages and set the offset=1cm 0pt within a "blank" twoside document:

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{geometry,pdfpages}

\geometry{
  paperwidth=115mm,% A6 paper width + 1cm
  paperheight=148mm,% A6 paper height
  twoside
}

\pagestyle{empty}% Keep this document completely blank

\begin{document}

\includepdf[pages=-,offset=1cm 0pt,frame]{lipsum50}

\end{document}

I've added a frame to each page for visual clarity, but you don't need it.

If you want to maintain an A6 final output, you can scale each page down by a factor of 0.904762 (95mm / 105mm) and use an offset=5mm 0pt movement:

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{geometry,pdfpages}

\geometry{
  paper=a6paper,
  twoside
}

\pagestyle{empty}% Keep this document completely blank

\begin{document}

% 95mm / 105mm ~ 0.9047619047619047619047619047619...
\includepdf[pages=-,offset=5mm 0pt,scale=0.904762,frame]{lipsum50}

\end{document}
  • I'm sorry and quite embarassed: you did exactly what I was asking for!!! Just that later I noticed that I asked flawedly. I figure the solution I was looking for was closer to another one of your anwers: I'm aiming to get as result an equal size a6 paper (not bigger), with the original pdf size reduced proportionaly. Still possible? I'll edit the question – nilon May 27 '16 at 6:08
  • my bad on pdf, now clear. I really appreciate the effort and help. I keep trying but there's something I'm missing. I'm suspicious of where my error is. I understand that the resulting awesome text (nice use of adjectives!) is, or should be, framed and with proper outset in a6 paper. Problem is when I try to print these a6 four times into an a4paper, most of the right side goes out of margin. What can I correct? Would you please like to give it a try and let me know? – nilon May 28 '16 at 4:26
  • @nilon: Did you set \parindent=0pt? – Werner May 28 '16 at 5:28
3

Although not a direct answer to your question because your layout will be recalculated, next time you may want to have a look at the bcor option of the Koma-script classes (e.g. scrbook). This option was specifically designed to add a binding correction like you seem to want.

  • Quick response: set BCOR=(#)p. I'll keep digging there. – nilon May 27 '16 at 7:07
  • 1
    Yes, the class authors are pretty strict in terms of layout. Chapter 2 on the typearea package explain their reasoning. You could check the LaTeX output (.log file) for the exact value of the DIV value when you're not setting the bcor and then force this DIV value after setting the bcor in the class options. See Figure 2.1 in the manual for an illustration of BCOR and DIV. – ph0t0nix May 27 '16 at 8:31

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