1

Fairly new to LaTeX. I'm using the template found at https://github.com/zachscrivena/simple-resume-cv to write a simple resume.

In it, there is markup which I do not understand:

\section
{Languages}
{Languages}
{PDF:Languages}

From what I understand, the first {Languages} shows up in the title of the section on the resume itself, the second {Languages} shows up as the title of the link in the bookmarks of the PDF on the side pane. I have no idea what {PDF:Languages} is and have guessed some terminology, but couldn't find it because I don't know the proper term for it.

Removing that term will cause the resume to be unable to be compiled.

Also, in the future, will there be an easier way for me to figure out the origin of LaTeX syntax?

4

The class simpleresumecv defines macro \section with three arguments:

% Macro: section (new section for Education, Research Experience, etc.).
\renewcommand{\section}[3]{\\[-1em]\pdfbookmark[2]{#2}{#3}\\%
{\UseSectionFont\raggedright\MakeUppercase{#1}}%
&}

The third argument is used as last mandatory argument for \pdfbookmark, defined by package hyperref. The argument is used as the main part of the anchor name for the target of the bookmark. It can be any text string, but it must ensure, that the condition holds, that anchor names are unique.

  • Thanks! I overlooked that \section could be overwritten. From now, I see that terms inside {} braces should considered as arguments. – user2193268 Jun 17 '16 at 22:49
  • @user2193268 The curly braces have many functions. Grouping tokens to arguments is one of them. Others are a local group (e.g., {\bfseries bold text}) and a math subformula. – Heiko Oberdiek Jun 17 '16 at 23:38
4

If you look at the  simple-resume-cv.cls, you'll see arguments #2 and #3 are used by the \pdfbookmark command from hyperref. This command has a first optional argument, the bookmark level, and a pair of mandatory arguments: #2 is the text which appears in the resulting .pdf file, and #3 is the name of the anchor , for navigation.

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