3

I write a thesis in German, but have to cite lots of Greek polytonic text. The strange thing is that when I set the default language to German and the other language to Greek, I get different glyphs for the lambda and theta:

\documentclass[twoside,a4paper,12pt]{report}
\usepackage{polyglossia}
\setdefaultlanguage[variant=new]{german}
\setotherlanguage[variant=poly]{greek}
\usepackage{fontspec}
\defaultfontfeatures[\rmfamily,\sffamily]{Mapping=tex-text}
\setmainfont{CMU Serif}

\begin{document}

λαμβδα

\end{document}

If I change default and other language and vice versa I get different glyphs (wouldn't be a problem if the glyphs with German default language wouldn't look that ugly). German

Greek

any help apreciated!

  • Welcome to TeX.SX! Use \setmainfont{CMU Serif}[Script=Greek]. Note that Mapping=tex-text is automatically applied, so you don't need the \defaultfontfeatures line. – egreg Jul 3 '16 at 15:33
3

It seems to be a feature of CMU Serif, that uses different glyphs for Greek when the script is Latin.

You can do

\setmainfont{CMU Serif}[Script=Greek]

and the result will be the same. However, it's better to properly segregate the other language using \foreignlanguage or the otherlanguage or otherlanguage* environment.

\documentclass[twoside,a4paper,12pt]{report}
\usepackage{polyglossia}
\setdefaultlanguage[variant=new]{german}
\setotherlanguage[variant=poly]{greek}
\usepackage{fontspec}
\setmainfont{CMU Serif}

\begin{document}

Deutsch \foreignlanguage{greek}{λαμβδα} äöü

\end{document}

enter image description here

Note that the line

\defaultfontfeatures[\rmfamily,\sffamily]{Mapping=tex-text}

is not needed, because the feature is automatically applied.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.