3

I write a thesis in German, but have to cite lots of Greek polytonic text. The strange thing is that when I set the default language to German and the other language to Greek, I get different glyphs for the lambda and theta:

\documentclass[twoside,a4paper,12pt]{report}
\usepackage{polyglossia}
\setdefaultlanguage[variant=new]{german}
\setotherlanguage[variant=poly]{greek}
\usepackage{fontspec}
\defaultfontfeatures[\rmfamily,\sffamily]{Mapping=tex-text}
\setmainfont{CMU Serif}

\begin{document}

λαμβδα

\end{document}

If I change default and other language and vice versa I get different glyphs (wouldn't be a problem if the glyphs with German default language wouldn't look that ugly). German

Greek

any help apreciated!

1
  • Welcome to TeX.SX! Use \setmainfont{CMU Serif}[Script=Greek]. Note that Mapping=tex-text is automatically applied, so you don't need the \defaultfontfeatures line.
    – egreg
    Jul 3, 2016 at 15:33

1 Answer 1

3

It seems to be a feature of CMU Serif, that uses different glyphs for Greek when the script is Latin.

You can do

\setmainfont{CMU Serif}[Script=Greek]

and the result will be the same. However, it's better to properly segregate the other language using \foreignlanguage or the otherlanguage or otherlanguage* environment.

\documentclass[twoside,a4paper,12pt]{report}
\usepackage{polyglossia}
\setdefaultlanguage[variant=new]{german}
\setotherlanguage[variant=poly]{greek}
\usepackage{fontspec}
\setmainfont{CMU Serif}

\begin{document}

Deutsch \foreignlanguage{greek}{λαμβδα} äöü

\end{document}

enter image description here

Note that the line

\defaultfontfeatures[\rmfamily,\sffamily]{Mapping=tex-text}

is not needed, because the feature is automatically applied.

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