6

This question already has an answer here:

Recently I became aware of the Unicode symbol 'DIVISION TIMES' (U+22C7), which is ⋇. That is, it is a hybrid of times and division and the intended semantics ought to be the multiplicative analogue of the well-known ±, which can be typeset in LaTeX by \pm.

Is there a command like \pm for getting ⋇? (Detexify does not recognize it.)

If there is no command, how would one go about typesetting this in LaTeX?

I am given to understand some variants of LaTeX support Unicode, so it would be non-issue there, but I would like to know about other ways.

marked as duplicate by Community Jul 16 '16 at 18:32

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • The question is mainly idle curiosity, I hope this is alright. But I liked this site since a long time, yet never joined, so I jumped on that opportunity. – quid Jul 16 '16 at 14:05
  • I had searched for the Unicode on the site; not sure how I missed it. – quid Jul 16 '16 at 18:33
7

According to http://detexify.kirelabs.org/classify.html

The command you are looking for is \divideontimes, can be used in mathmode only, and requires the amssymb-package.

  • This is very strange. We were two that could not find it there. Maybe we did not draw it well enough. I now tried again, and there it is! Thanks for the help. – quid Jul 16 '16 at 14:14
  • @quid DeTeXify is a fickle tool. btw: if that solves your problem, feel free to accept the answer. – naphaneal Jul 16 '16 at 14:18
  • @quid: I managed to find it too; curiously I still think my drawing that didn't work was better: henning.makholm.net/misc/divideontimes.png (Don't judge; they were made on a trackpad). – Henning Makholm Jul 16 '16 at 14:18
  • @HenningMakholm I found it when I drew the 'X' (starting top left -> down right, down left -> top right) first, then the '-' and last the two dots as circles (top first). – naphaneal Jul 16 '16 at 14:21

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.