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Right now, I'm numbering example sentences using the enumitempackage and \setlist[enumerate]{label={(\arabic*)},resume}. Some are just simple, one line sentences like in this example taken from a scientific paper:

enter image description here

So I simply used

\begin{enumerate}
\item a. Example Sentence One \\ b. Example Sentence Two
\end{enumerate}

But for some, they have translations underneath, and I'd like to have them aligned, so I supposed the right way to do it was with tables. I'm not sure if that's the best idea. Here is a code I'm using now:

\begin{tabular}{l l l}

(4) & a. & \specialcell[t]{Anna \textbf{kauft} heute ein Kleid. \\ 
\textit{Anna buys today a dress}} \\

& b. & \specialcell[t]{Anna will heute ein Kleid \textbf{kaufen}. \\
\textit{Anna wants today a dress buy}} \\

\end{tabular}

I would like it to look like this:

enter image description here

My question is, what's the right code to have it look this way, and still have a continuous numbering, like I managed to do with the simple sentences? Should I even use tables, because I will have 'real' tables in my document, with a numbering of their own, so maybe I should not mix them up? Maybe I should be using a different code altogether?

5
  • Why don't you use nested enumerate environments? Is the indentation the problem ? – Christian Aug 30 '16 at 12:30
  • Because I'm a total LaTeX beginner, and probably too stupid, yet. Could you give an example of how that would look (in code and compiled)? – reenah Aug 30 '16 at 12:33
  • I can't do this in the comments and I do not want to post an answer before I really understand the question. Do I understand it correctly that the indentation is important for you? Sorry, if my first comment sounded harsh - it was not meant to be. – Christian Aug 30 '16 at 12:35
  • You might benefit from the gb4e package. – Gareth Walker Aug 30 '16 at 12:43
  • I was too fast in answering and agree with @GarethWalker. Should I delete my answer? – Christian Aug 30 '16 at 12:53
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Using gb4e

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{gb4e}
\begin{document}
\begin{exe}
\ex
\begin{xlist}
\ex
\gll  Anna kauft heute ein Kleid\\
     Anna buys today a dress\\
\trans `Anna buys a dress today'
\ex 
Anna kauft heute ein Kleid
\trans `Anna buys a dress today'
\end{xlist}
\ex
\gll  Anna kauft heute ein Kleid\\
     Anna buys today a dress\\
\end{exe}
\begin{exe}
\ex Anna buys a dress today
\end{exe}
\end{document}

enter image description here

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  • Thank you! I was not aware of this package for linguistics, but it's exactly what I need. I still have to figure out how to use it, when I only have one or two English sentences that do not require a direct and proper translation. – reenah Aug 30 '16 at 14:51
  • The updated code shows some further features. Is there something you want to do not covered there? – Gareth Walker Aug 30 '16 at 15:03
  • Thank you! That's very helpful, and I could figure the last thing I needed out for myself (i.e. have two or more examples, but no glosses or translations). – reenah Aug 31 '16 at 6:59
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I think you can use nested enumerate environments. The enumerate package provides the option of adding parameters to the enumerate environment in square brackets which both indicates the numbering style. The command \setcounter{enumi}{3} sets the current counter for the first level of enumerate to 3. At the next occurrence of \item it will be increased by one, so the next \item produces the result (4).

In the following, I changed your second example into an example using two enumerate environments.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{enumerate}

\begin{document}
\begin{enumerate}[(1)]
\setcounter{enumi}{3}
\item \begin{enumerate}[a.]
    \item Anna \textbf{kauft} heute ein Kleid. \\ 
      \textit{Anna buys today a dress}
  \end{enumerate}
  \item Anna will heute ein Kleid \textbf{kaufen}. \\
    \textit{Anna wants today a dress buy}
  \end{enumerate} 
\end{enumerate}
\end{document}

Is this the result you would like to have?

enter image description here

1
  • Thank you, but Gareth answer was even better, because it was for linguistic examples, and there you prefer to have the words aligned with the first example sentence's words. – reenah Aug 30 '16 at 14:52

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