1

I try to use \leftskip and \rightskip together with \pstart and \pend in reledmac. My goal is to set titles centered and have the left and right margin increased. This is what I have so far:

\documentclass{scrbook}
\usepackage{reledmac}
\begin{document}
\beginnumbering
\rightskip=3em
\leftskip=3em
{\centering\pstart Romeo and Juliet \pend}
{\centering\pstart (First performance by the  Theatre in the Winter 1564, played by Shakespeare and his company the Lord Chamberlain’s Men)\pend}
\rightskip=0em
\leftskip=0em
\pstart Romeo and Juliet is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare early in his career about two young star-crossed lovers whose deaths ultimately reconcile their feuding families. It was among Shakespeare's most popular plays during his lifetime and, along with Hamlet, is one of his most frequently performed plays. Today, the title characters are regarded as archetypal young lovers.
\pend
{}\endnumbering
 \end{document}

Unfortunately the title and subtitle are not responding to the skip-commands. I know I could use the eledchapter etc.-commands but that would mean I would have to totally rewrite them as i need no space before and after, nothing in the toc, no space between heading and subheading and text etc. etc.

  • 1
    setting \leftskip and \rightskip directly certainly isn't supported in latex not just reledmac depending on where they are set they will be ignored, over-written by environment settings or completely break list environments that need the various latex length parameters to be set consistently, not just the primitives. (that doesn't mean you can't make it work but...) – David Carlisle Sep 12 '16 at 9:28
1

Move \rightskip and \leftskip after \pstart. The latter resets these values. Like this:

\documentclass{scrbook}
\usepackage{reledmac}
\begin{document}
\beginnumbering
\pstart\noindent\centering
  Romeo and Juliet
\pend
\pstart\noindent\leftskip=3em plus1fill\rightskip\leftskip
  (First performance by the  Theatre in the Winter 1564,
  played by Shakespeare and his company the Lord Chamberlain’s Men)
\pend
\medskip
\pstart
  Romeo and Juliet is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare
  early in his career about two young star-crossed lovers whose deaths
  ultimately reconcile their feuding families. It was among
  Shakespeare's most popular plays during his lifetime and, along with
  Hamlet, is one of his most frequently performed plays. Today, the
  title characters are regarded as archetypal young lovers.
\pend
\endnumbering
\end{document}

enter image description here

  • This is better, though now the second line is stretched. I tried to sneak in a \vfill but that doesn’t work. – Martin Mueller Sep 12 '16 at 10:11
  • \vfill is for vertical space. You'd need something like \hfill. I've modified my solution to do more or less what you want. The centering is not yet symmetric for some mysterious reason that I can't research at the moment. – gernot Sep 12 '16 at 10:33
  • 1
    Ok, now I also fixed the asymmetry of the centered text. The reason was not so mysterious at all: each paragraph is indented, which had to be undone. – gernot Sep 12 '16 at 19:53
1

I suggest to control the line breaks in the heading manually, which makes sense anyway. (Omit \medskip if you don't want to have space between heading and text.)

\documentclass{scrbook}
\usepackage{reledmac}
\begin{document}
\beginnumbering
{\centering
\pstart Romeo and Juliet \pend
\pstart (First performance by the  Theatre in the Winter 1564,\\
  played by Shakespeare and his company the Lord Chamberlain’s Men)
\pend
}\medskip
\pstart
  Romeo and Juliet is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare
  early in his career about two young star-crossed lovers whose deaths
  ultimately reconcile their feuding families. It was among
  Shakespeare's most popular plays during his lifetime and, along with
  Hamlet, is one of his most frequently performed plays. Today, the
  title characters are regarded as archetypal young lovers.
\pend
\endnumbering
\end{document}

enter image description here

  • Thank you, that is a working solution. Yet actually not what I have in mind. I still don't know the final font and that might change the placement of the line break. – Martin Mueller Sep 12 '16 at 9:52

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