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I have the following expression (representing the Taylor expansion of a function of two variables):

\begin{equation}
  B^{n}(s,p) = \left(\left\( \begin{array}{ll}
     a_{10}s + a_{01}p+a_{20}s^{2} +a_{11}sp +...+a_{03}p^{3}\\
     b_{10}s + b_{01}p + b_{20}s^{2} + b_{11}sp + ...+b_{03}p^{3}\end{array} \right) + O(|(s,p)|^{4}) \right 
  \label{Taylorf}        
\end{equation}

When I compile the file, I get the following two error messages:

! Missing delimiter (. inserted).
<to be read again>
\begingroup
l.435 B^{n}(s,p) = \left(\left\(
\begin{array}{ll}
I was expecting to see something like `(' or `\{' or
`\}' here. If you typed, e.g., `{' instead of `\{', you
should probably delete the `{' by typing `1' now, so that
braces don't get unbalanced. Otherwise just proceed.
Acceptable delimiters are characters whose \delcode is
nonnegative, or you can use `\delimiter <delimiter code>'.

! LaTeX Error: Bad math environment delimiter.

However, the file is still compiled and the output pdf file looks fine to me. So what is the problem and how do I correct the two errors?

Secondly, what can I do to get the coefficients "a" and "b" to align underneath each other?

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1 Answer 1

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There is no delimiter \( and you have \right without a delimiter at the end.

Here's a possible layout that you may be after:

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{amsmath}

\begin{document}

\begin{equation}
  \setlength{\arraycolsep}{0pt}
  B^n(s,p) = \Biggl(\biggl( \begin{array}{ *{6}{r} }
     a_{10}s +{} & a_{01}p +{} & a_{20}s^2 +{} & a_{11}sp +{} & \dots +{} & a_{03}p^3 \\
     b_{10}s +{} & b_{01}p +{} & b_{20}s^2 +{} & b_{11}sp +{} & \dots +{} & b_{03}p^3
  \end{array} \biggr) + O\bigl(|(s,p)|^4\bigr) \Biggr)
\end{equation}

\end{document}

Horizontal alignment between the array rows are achieved by setting each term inside a right-aligned column. Spacing around + is maintained by supplying an empty group in places where there is no term left within the cell.

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