0

I have the following tex code,

\begin{equation}
\ket{f_{\alpha}(\bm{r}+\bm{e}_{\alpha} \Delta t, t+\Delta t)} = 
\ket{f_{\alpha}(\bm{r},t)} -\bm{M}^{-1}\hat{\bm{S}}
(\ket{m_{\alpha}(\bm{r},t)}-\ket{m_{\alpha}^{(eq)}(\bm{r},t)}),
\end{equation}

which provides the following equation eqn The right-most ket operator is bigger due to the ^(eq). How to bring the ket brace to normal size?

  • Can you add the definition of \ket – Salim Bou Sep 23 '16 at 17:23
  • It's part of the physics package. You can refer this answer: tex.stackexchange.com/a/214731/44940 – Sathish Sanjeevi Sep 23 '16 at 17:32
  • in this answer (actually, a non-answer), Braket size problem, one of the examples uses \smash to diminish the height of what's inside the brakets. that's the approach i'd suggest. if you find that useful, i'll produce a "tailored" solution for this particular example. – barbara beeton Sep 23 '16 at 17:44
  • 3
    according to texdoc physics you can use \ket* to suppress automatic sizing (see page 8) – David Carlisle Sep 23 '16 at 17:46
  • @DavidCarlisle -- thanks for mentioning the physics package. i only knew about braket, and the features and support are different. so what is done depends on which package is actually used. – barbara beeton Sep 23 '16 at 17:55
1

according to

texdoc physics

you can use \ket* to suppress automatic sizing (see page 6)

  • The joys of \left and \right – egreg Sep 23 '16 at 19:54

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.