1

I'm using the amsart document class with swapped theorem numbers (by using \swapnumbers), and I'd like to label some of my theorems, lemmas, examples, etc. with a star in front of the number like *4.5. Theorem to indicate that they're not necessary for the reader to know. Is there a simple way to do this?

  • Should the asterisk also appear in cross-references? – egreg Sep 25 '16 at 16:56
  • if it's acceptable to have the asterisk always in the outside margin, the marginnote package may be used, with \marginnote{*} inserted just before the text of the theorem. – barbara beeton Sep 25 '16 at 17:11
  • For my purposes appearing in the cross references is okay because I don't need to cross reference these starred pieces, but I wouldn't want anything to spill over into the margin. – Peter Haine Sep 25 '16 at 17:53
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It is easy if the asterisk should also appear in cross-references.

\documentclass{amsart}
\usepackage{etoolbox}

\swapnumbers
\newtheorem{theorem}{Theorem}
\numberwithin{theorem}{section}
\newenvironment{theorem*}
 {\preto{\thetheorem}{*}\theorem}
 {\endtheorem}

\begin{document}

\section{Title}

\begin{theorem}\label{easy}
This is an easy theorem.
\end{theorem}

\begin{theorem*}\label{hard}
The zeros of the zeta function have real part equal to $1/2$.
\end{theorem*}

Theorem~\ref{easy} is an easy consequence of theorem~\ref{hard}
a proof of which is too long for this short note.

\end{document}

enter image description here

A non hacked version without the asterisk in cross-references allows for having the asterisk out in the margin.

\documentclass{amsart}

\newtheoremstyle{swapped}%  <name>
  {\topsep}%                <space above>
  {\topsep}%                <space below>
  {\itshape}%               <body font>
  {}%                       <indent amount>
  {\bfseries}%              <theorem head font>
  {.}%                      <punctuation after theorem head>
  {.5em}%                   <space after theorem head>
  {\thmnumber{\textnormal{#2} }\thmname{#1}\thmnote{ (#3)}}% <theorem head spec>
\newtheoremstyle{starred}%  <name>
  {\topsep}%                <space above>
  {\topsep}%                <space below>
  {\itshape}%               <body font>
  {}%                       <indent amount>
  {\bfseries}%              <theorem head font>
  {.}%                      <punctuation after theorem head>
  {.5em}%                   <space after theorem head>
  {\thmnumber{\textnormal{\makebox[0pt][r]{*}#2} }\thmname{#1}\thmnote{ (#3)}}% <theorem head spec>

\theoremstyle{swapped}
\newtheorem{theorem}{Theorem}
\numberwithin{theorem}{section}

\theoremstyle{starred}
\newtheorem{theorem*}[theorem]{Theorem}

\begin{document}

\section{Title}

\begin{theorem}\label{easy}
This is an easy theorem.
\end{theorem}

\begin{theorem*}\label{hard}
The zeros of the zeta function have real part equal to $1/2$.
\end{theorem*}

Theorem~\ref{easy} is an easy consequence of theorem~\ref{hard}
a proof of which is too long for this short note.

\end{document}

enter image description here

A hacked version of the same, which allows avoiding \newtheoremstyle:

\documentclass{amsart}
\usepackage{etoolbox}

\swapnumbers
\newtheorem{theorem}{Theorem}
\numberwithin{theorem}{section}

\makeatletter
\newenvironment{theorem*}
 {\patchcmd\@thm{\csname}{\makebox[0pt][r]{*}\csname}{}{}\theorem}
 {\endtheorem}
\makeatother

\begin{document}

\section{Title}

\begin{theorem}\label{easy}
This is an easy theorem.
\end{theorem}

\begin{theorem*}\label{hard}
The zeros of the zeta function have real part equal to $1/2$.
\end{theorem*}

Theorem~\ref{easy} is an easy consequence of theorem~\ref{hard}
a proof of which is too long for this short note.

\end{document}
  • Thanks for such a thorough answer! This is exactly what I was looking for. – Peter Haine Sep 25 '16 at 17:51
  • @PeterHaine Which one of the three? – egreg Sep 25 '16 at 17:52
  • for what I'm doing at the moment, the first is the most convenient, but I'm genuinely interested in how to do all of them. – Peter Haine Sep 25 '16 at 17:58

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