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I am pretty new to latex and have seen a paper which font I would like to use. I think some of the advance users will recognize it in a minute or so. Can someone help me out?

Thanks in advance.

Peterfont example

  • 3
    if you have the pdf, then acrobat or the pdffonts utility will show all the fonts in the document. – David Carlisle Oct 10 '16 at 20:53
  • Welcome to TeX.SX! You can have a look at our starter guide to familiarize yourself further with our format. – Martin Schröder Oct 10 '16 at 20:59
  • @DavidCarlisle I have the pdf indeed. Acrobat shows multiple fonts, the first is ArialMT. However when I use the arialmt.sty in latex, the font in the output file is different than showed in the image. Helvetica is also shown as a font, which is also a font in LaTeX right? – peter Oct 10 '16 at 21:29
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    Arial/Helvetica are sans serif fonts, while your image shows a serif font, surely there are more fonts in the list? By the way, some general answers to questions like this: tex.stackexchange.com/questions/45919/… – Torbjørn T. Oct 10 '16 at 21:31
  • arial/helevtical are sans serif, clearly the fonts shown are not those – David Carlisle Oct 10 '16 at 21:32
4

It looks like the standard font (Computer Modern):

\documentclass{article}
\begin{document}
\section{Introduction}
This paper sheds some light on the role of cross-border capital flows in the
post-2008 divergence of sovereign bond yields within the European Monetary
Union (EMU). I identify a fragility of monetary union sovereign debt,
focusing on the inability of sovereign nations to control their own currency
in combination with a large capital outflow.
\end{document}

Result

Update:

The PDF of the OP confirms it, both fonts CMR10 and CMBX12 (section title) are present among the fonts of the OP: mostly Computer Modern and Helvetica/ArialMT as sans-serif font, not shown in the image of the question.

| improve this answer | |
  • It is, according to his linked PDF. – wilx Oct 10 '16 at 21:37
  • I thought it looked like cm:-) – David Carlisle Oct 10 '16 at 21:42
  • Thank you! So in order to get almost the same style as the paper I have posted, I should not do anything regarding to the font (as Computer Modern is the standard)? – peter Oct 10 '16 at 22:33
  • @peter Yes. (In case of many accented letters, the Latin Modern fonts (kind of successor of Computer Modern) like \usepackage[T1]{fontenc}\usepackage{lmodern} would be a choice. – Heiko Oberdiek Oct 11 '16 at 4:56

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