7

I am trying to typeset

d_{t}= \mathcal{K}_{D,t}^{\alpha_D} h_{D,t}^{1-\alpha_D}

where the variables are \mathcal{K}_{D,t} and h_{D,t}, and \alpha_D is a parameter.

Sample output

The equation looks really messy, and the typesetting does not make it easy to read, or to distinguish the variable (with the subscripts) from the exponent (which is not part of the variable).

Any tips on how to better typeset this messy equation?

11

Just add some brackets. Ordinary round brackets around the terms would be best. If you don't want to add these extra symbols to the equation then you can just use grouping writing {K_{D,t}}^{\alpha_D} etc., but this is not so clear.

Sample output

\documentclass{article}

\begin{document}

\begin{displaymath}
  d_{t}= (\mathcal{K}_{D,t})^{\alpha_D} (h_{D,t})^{1-\alpha_D}
\end{displaymath}

\begin{displaymath}
  d_{t}= {\mathcal{K}_{D,t}}^{\alpha_D} {h_{D,t}}^{1-\alpha_D}
\end{displaymath}

\end{document}

For completeness, it has been suggested by Astrinus that another possibility it the last case is to move the superscript to be vertically above the t. This avoids the appearance of t being raised to a power, however I still think the version with round brackets is clearest.

Sample alternative output

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{mathtools}

\begin{document}

\begin{displaymath}
  d_{t}= {\mathcal{K}_{D,\mathrlap{t}}}^{\alpha_D} {h_{D,\mathrlap{t}}}^{1-\alpha_D}
\end{displaymath}

\end{document}
  • Maybe \llaping the "t" subscript could improve the second formula? – Astrinus Oct 26 '16 at 6:48
  • @Astrinus Given the OPs description of the "variables" I think that would just add to the confusion. But you are right that one wishes to avoid readings these as powers of the t. My main recommendation is the round brackets. – Andrew Swann Oct 26 '16 at 6:50
  • Thanks a lot for the fast and helpful answer! @Astrinus: Does your comment concern only the equation in question, or would you change the display of the subscript in general? (say, in my paper) – Chris tie Oct 26 '16 at 7:24
  • @Christie This is only an opinion: in the second equation (the one without parentheses), I would move the superscript on the left, aligned with the comma. But I agree with Andrew Swann that the first version is better. – Astrinus Oct 26 '16 at 7:35
  • @Astrinus I have now added an example showing your suggestion. – Andrew Swann Oct 26 '16 at 8:17

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