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This question already has an answer here:

I am trying to translate a piece of French material (in English) and here is my codes:

\documentclass[12pt]{article}
\usepackage[english]{babel}
\usepackage{amsmath,amsthm,amssymb,amsfonts}
\usepackage{geometry}\geometry{margin=1in}
\usepackage{paracol}


\begin{document}

\newpage
\begin{sloppypar}
 \begin{paracol}{2}  
 1. Il y a plus de 50 ans que l'ingénieur Heaviside introduisit  ses règles de calcul symbolique, dans un mémoire audacieux où des calculs mathématiques fort peu justifiés sont utilisés pour la solution de problèmes de physique.\\ 
 \switchcolumn

 \end{paracol}
\end{sloppypar}

\end{document}

But when I run the codes in TeXStudio, the accented letters completely disappear. (For instance, "ingénieur" in the first sentence becomes "ingnieur".)

enter image description here

Is there a quicker way to fix this than manully typing the accented letters as in this answer?

marked as duplicate by Werner, Au101, Community Nov 18 '16 at 20:14

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 1
    Not to be rude, but does the answer below that not help you? – Au101 Nov 18 '16 at 19:50
  • 2
    Add \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} to your preamble, as suggested in the first answer in How to type special/accented letters in LaTeX? (that you link to). – Werner Nov 18 '16 at 19:51
  • @Au101: You are absolutely right. The answer in the link I gave is the first one I read and I didn't try the one below it. Sorry for the duplicate. – Jack Nov 18 '16 at 20:13
  • @Werner: Since I didn't know what utf8 is, I didn't try that one. Stupid me. Thanks for your comment. – Jack Nov 18 '16 at 20:14
  • 1
    @Jack No worries, it happens. UTF-8 is a character encoding. It's a standard. It's a standard that says the hexadecimal number 20AC is € for example. So the point is, if we all follow the standard, then 20AC on my computer, on your computer and on Werner's computer will display the right character, assuming our font uses UTF-8. UTF-8 is pretty ubiquitous and supports all of Unicode's code points. It's basically a way of ensuring that when I type € I see €, you see €, everyone sees € – Au101 Nov 18 '16 at 20:25
2

If your document is in UTF-8, then insert

\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}

It it is in Latin-1 then replace utf8 with latin1

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