4

I would like to insert a pdf document of 2 pages in my document only on the bottom half part of the page. Using the pdfpages package with the command

\includepdf[nup=2x1,pages=-]{<mypdf>}

place the 2 pages side by side but half of my page is "lost". I would like to be able to use the upper half of my page as I want, and insert this 2 pages in the bottom half.

Here is an illustration of the result that I would like

enter image description here

Any help would be much appreciate.

  • I think using \includegraphics twice inside a table would do it – ebosi Dec 7 '16 at 15:49
  • Thank you for your answer. I tried it but I havn't succed to place it side by side using all the length of the page. Would you mind giving me a code for it? – Zanzi Dec 7 '16 at 15:54
7

You can place the pages using \includegraphics and specify the pages separately:

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage[margin=1in]{geometry}
\usepackage{graphicx,lipsum}

\renewcommand{\bottomfraction}{.7}% Allow up to 70% of bottom-floats to be on a page
\begin{document}

\section{A section}
\lipsum[1-7]

\begin{figure}[b]
  \includegraphics[width=.5\linewidth,page=1]{lipsum50}%
  \includegraphics[width=.5\linewidth,page=2]{lipsum50}
\end{figure}

\lipsum[8-14]

\end{document}

We ensure each page fits exactly within the text width (setting their widths to be .5\linewidth). Depending on the page geometry, you may have to update \bottomfraction as well, allowing a certain portion of the page to be taken up by floats. See How to influence the position of float environments like figure and table in LaTeX? and/or How can I get the figures not to be pushed to the end of the document?

lipsum50.pdf is a document that just has \lipsum[1-50] in it.

  • I didn't know that \includgraphics accepts a page option, and have resorted to pdfTeX primitives to achieve this in the past. AFAICT, the page option is undocumented, at least in grfguide.pdf. Perhaps I am looking in the wrong place? – Harald Hanche-Olsen Dec 7 '16 at 16:07
  • @HaraldHanche-Olsen: Talk to David in chat. I've started a conversation. – Werner Dec 7 '16 at 16:14
  • Does it make sense to also use keepaspectratio? – StrongBad Dec 7 '16 at 21:27
  • @StrongBad: Without specifying an additional height parameter, the aspect ratio will be preserved. You can add it, if you want. – Werner Dec 7 '16 at 21:32
4

This solution embeds two minipages into a floating picture-environment.
Instead of defining the width of the included pictures (i.e. pdf) this solution use the "updated" linewidth of the minipages. You can refer to Werner's approach for lighter solution.

(Note that \fbox are here just for making pages boundaries more obvious. You can/should of course remove it in your final document.)

enter image description here

\documentclass{scrartcl}
    \usepackage{graphicx}
    \usepackage{array}
    \usepackage{lipsum}
\begin{document}
    \lipsum
    \begin{figure}[!b]
        \begin{minipage}[c]{.5\linewidth}
            \fbox{\includegraphics[page=1, width=\linewidth]{pdf-to-be-included.pdf}}
        \end{minipage}
        \hfill
        \begin{minipage}[c]{.5\linewidth}
            \fbox{\includegraphics[page=2, width=\linewidth]{pdf-to-be-included.pdf}}
        \end{minipage}
    \end{figure}
    \lipsum
\end{document}
  • @Zanzi Note that a .5\linewidth minipage is a bit wider that 50% of the \linewidth due to inner/outer sep. Thus, the embedded pdf encroachs upon margin. So go for Werner's solution! – ebosi Dec 7 '16 at 16:09
  • Yes, I figured it out that. Your solution was almost perfect. – Zanzi Dec 7 '16 at 16:12

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