1

I am having a large figure with subfigures which should appear on a single-page. However, the footnote appears on the previous page. How do I ensure, that it will appear on the same page of the figure?

\begin{figure}[p]
\begin{subfigure}{.5\textwidth}
  \centering
  \includegraphics[width=.8\linewidth]{images/img_experiment_1_cross.pdf}
  \caption{Experiment 1}
  \label{fig:exp-1-cross}
\end{subfigure}%
\begin{subfigure}{.5\textwidth}
  \centering
  \includegraphics[width=.8\linewidth]{images/img_experiment_1_mut.pdf}
  \caption{Experiment 1}
  \label{fig:exp-1-mut}
\end{subfigure}
%...
\caption{Visual representation fo experiments \protect\footnotemark}\label{fig:experiment-results}
\end{figure}
\footnotetext{Own represenation of results}
1

I suppose you take this answer Using \footnote in a figure's \caption and wanted to adapt it for you.

However, what you want to do is not possible: the plain format of the figure environment do not accept any text on the page.

I do not recommend to do it, but you can use something like removing the plain format and use !h option instead. For instance, this code:

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{subcaption}
\usepackage{graphicx}

\begin{document}    
\begin{figure}[h!]
    \begin{subfigure}{.5\textwidth}
        \centering
        \includegraphics[height=.8\textheight, trim={0 0 1000 0}, clip]{img.png}
        \caption{Experiment 1}
        \label{fig:exp-1-cross}
    \end{subfigure}%
    \begin{subfigure}{.5\textwidth}
        \centering
        \includegraphics[width=.8\linewidth]{img.png}
        \caption{Experiment 1}
        \label{fig:exp-1-mut}
    \end{subfigure}
    \caption{Visual representation fo experiments \protect\footnotemark}
    \label{fig:experiment-results}
\end{figure}
\footnotetext{Test with \texttt{protect} and \texttt{footnotemark}}

\end{document}

give this output: enter image description here

  • 1
    You can combine it with package afterpage and use \afterpage{\clearpage\begin{figure}[h!]…\end{figure}\footnotetext{…}\clearpage} to have the figure on a page on its own next to the current page. – Schweinebacke Jul 8 '17 at 6:31

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