1

First I would like to thanks for the support and effort for helping me. Second is the problem. I'm writting an scientific article for ICEIS 2017 conference (www.iceis.org). It is a two-column article and I need to fit two two-coloum figures at the same page occupying the top, and the bottom of that page (conference restrictions, two-column figures must be at the beginning or end of page). I'm using figure* and the 't' and 'b' parameter. However 'b' is putting my figure at the end of the article along side with the following figures (I don't know why). 't' parameters works fine. Is there any specific page/floats configuration that I should know about? Illustrating scenario:

bla bla bla bla bla bla (text)
\begin{figure*}[!t]
   \centering
   {\includegraphics[width = 12 cm]{figureA}}
   \caption{Hi! I'm Figure A.}
   \label{fig:figureA}
\end{figure*}
bla bla bla bla bla bla (text)
\begin{figure*}[!b]
   \centering
   {\includegraphics[width = 12 cm]{figureB}}
   \caption{Figure B, thats me!.}
   \label{fig:figureA}
\end{figure*}
bla bla bla bla bla bla (text)

Figure:

ideal scenario

  • 1
    standard latex figure placement does not support b on 2-column figures, you could try the stfloats package – David Carlisle Dec 19 '16 at 14:25
2

The stfloats package provides this functionality

enter image description here

\documentclass[twocolumn]{article}
\usepackage{stfloats}
\usepackage{graphicx}
\begin{document}

bla bla bla bla bla bla (text)
\begin{figure*}[t]
   \centering
   \includegraphics[width = 6 cm]{example-image-a}
   \caption{Hi! I'm Figure A.}
   \label{fig:figureA}
\end{figure*}
\begin{figure*}[b]
   \centering
   \includegraphics[width = 6 cm]{example-image-b}
   \caption{Figure B, thats me!.}
   \label{fig:figureB}
\end{figure*}

\def\a{bla bla bla bla bla bla (text)}
\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a
\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a
\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a

zzz \a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a
\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a
\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a\a

\end{document}
1

Nothing new, but a real example with a short excerpt from Vasari's ‘Lives of the Most Excellent Painters, Sculptors, and Architects, from Cimabue to Our Times’, just for fun:

\documentclass[11pt, twocolumn]{article}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{ebgaramond}
\usepackage{geometry}
\usepackage{lettrine}
\usepackage[svgnames]{xcolor}%
\usepackage{stfloats}

\usepackage{graphicx, subcaption, caption}

\begin{document}

\lettrine{\color{DarkOliveGreen!75}W}{hile giorgione and corregio}, to their own great credit and glory, were honoring the regions of Lombardy, Tuscany, on her part, was not wanting in men of beautiful intellect; among whom, not one of the least was Piero, the son of one Lorenzo, a goldsmith, and a pupil of Cosimo Rosselli, after whom he was always called Piero di Cosimo, and known by no other name. And in truth, when a man teaches us excellence and gives us the secret of living rightly, he deserves no less gratitude from us, and should be held no less as a true father, than he who begets us and gives us life and nothing more.

\begin{figure*}[t]
  \centering
  \includegraphics[scale=0.4]{Piero_di_Cosimo₁}
  \caption{The death of Procris – ca 1500}
\end{figure*}

\begin{figure*}[b]
  \centering
  \includegraphics[scale=0.4]{venus-mars-and-cupid}
  \caption{Venus, Mars and Cupid– ca 1505}
\end{figure*}

Piero was entrusted by his father, who saw in his son a lively intelligence and an inclination to the art of design, to the care of Cosimo, who took him with no ordinary willingness; and seeing him grow no less in ability than in years, among the many disciples that he had, he bore him love as to a son, and always held him as such. This young man had by nature a most lofty spirit, and he was very strange, and different in fancy from the other youths who were working with Cosimo in order to learn the same art. He was at times so intent on what he was doing, that when some subject was being discussed, as often happens, at the end of the discussion it was necessary to go back to the beginning and tell him the whole, so far had his brain wandered after some other fancy of his own. And he was likewise so great a lover of solitude, that he knew no pleasure save that of going off by himself with his thoughts, letting his fancy roam and building his castles in the air. Right good reason had Cosimo, his master, for wishing him well, seeing that he made so much use of him in his works, that very often he caused him to execute things of great importance, knowing that Piero had a more beautiful manner, as well as better judgment, than himself. For this reason he took Piero with him to Rome, when he was summoned thither by Pope Sixtus in order to paint the scenes in his chapel; in one of which Piero executed a very beautiful landscape, as was related in the Life of Cosimo.

And since Piero drew most excellently from the life, he made in Rome many portraits of distinguished persons; in particular, those of Virginio Orsino and Ruberto Sanseverino, which he placed in the aforesaid scenes. Afterwards, also, he made a portrait of Duke Valentino, the son of Pope Alexander VI; which painting, to my knowledge, is not now to be found ; but the cartoon by his hand still exists, being in the possession of the reverend and cultured M. Cosimo Bartoli, Provost of S. Giovanni. In Florence, he painted many pictures for a number of citizens, which are dispersed among their various houses, and of such I have seen some that are very good; and so, also, various things for many other persons. In the Noviciate of S. Marco is a picture by his hand of Our Lady, standing, with the Child in her arms, coloured in oils. And for the Chapel of Gino Capponi, in the Church of S. Spirito at Florence, he painted a panel wherein is the Visitation of Our Lady, with S. Nicholas, and a S. Anthony who is reading with a pair of spectacles on his nose, a very spirited figure. Here he counterfeited a book bound in parchment, somewhat old, which seems to be real, and also some balls that he gave to the S. Nicholas, shining and casting gleams of light and reflections from one to another; from which even by that time men could perceive the strangeness of his brain, and his constant seeking after difficulties.

\end{document} 

enter image description here

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.