4

I would like to insert this equation into my paper:

enter image description here

As you can see, there is a emphasis under "round(...". I do not know how to do this (this equation is written in word). I want to make sure that "fine time shift" is in a new line so that this equation does not look like a fraction expression.

Thanks for your help!

  • 4
    This is something like an \underbrace{\Delta t...}{\text{Fine time shift...}} – user31729 Jan 7 '17 at 16:16
  • you could use \underbrace{} from the amsmath-package – naphaneal Jan 7 '17 at 16:16
6

Use the standard LaTeX command (math mode)

\underbrace{Text to be underbraced}_{Text under the brace in small print}

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath} % for the \text command
\newcommand\ntime{n_{\mathit{time}}}
\newcommand\nbeam{n_{\mathit{beam}}}
\newcommand\nelem{n_{\mathit{elem}}}
\newcommand\round{\mathop{round}}
\begin{document}
\[ \mathit{BF}(n_{\ntime},n_{\nbeam}) =\sum_{\nelem=0}^{\nelem} \mathit{Data}(\nelem,\ntime+
   \underbrace{\round(\Delta t(\nelem,\ntime,\nbeam)\cdot\mathit{fs})}_{\text{Fine time shift, interpolated Ts}}
   ,\nbeam)
\]
\end{document}
  • That completely solves my problem! Thank you so much! – mikuru Jan 7 '17 at 19:54

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