1

So I've got the following sentence

\documentclass[11pt]{article}
\usepackage[a4paper]{geometry}
\begin{document}
The disorder due to the anisotropic nature of the superconductor 
is known as ``quenched" disorder, and it is considered statistically 
as opposed to being dependent on variables such as temperature 
and magnetic field.
\end{document}

Instead of doing a line break before the word quenched, it's protruding outside of the margin (I suspect it's something to do with the quotation marks). Any ideas for how to fix this? I've thought about making a new paragraph and using \noindent but it feels sloppy. If that's the easiest way to do it, how does one remove the space between paragraphs (if there is any)?

Many thanks.

  • The first line of your text is slightly wider than \textwidth and word quenched seems has problem to hyphenate. If you hyphenate it manually, for example as quen\-ched, than it will be hyphenated without or with quotation marks. – Zarko Jan 19 '17 at 20:43
  • It is mostly do with there being no known hyphenation points in quenched. Either use microtype, reword, or add a hyphenation point, or use sloppy or an \emergencystretch on this paragraph. Cf. tex.stackexchange.com/q/241343/15925 and the linked questions. – Andrew Swann Jan 19 '17 at 20:45
  • 1
    @PeterThomas: Add \showhyphens{quenched} to your document (perhaps in the preamble) and check the .log (see Display hyphenation options for a specific word). You'll see that there's no hyphenation patterns defined for quenched, implying that it won't break or fully wrapped (nothing inbetween). For this you can supply the hyphenation using \hyphenation{quench-ed} (global) or quench\-ed (local). – Werner Jan 19 '17 at 21:12
  • if you apply the sloppypar environment to just this one paragraph, it will break the paragraph in the "most reasonable" manner without extending anything into the margin (unless you happen to have a single long unbreakable string that is longer than the line width). – barbara beeton Jan 19 '17 at 21:43
  • Don't use " for the closing quotes, but rather '' (two apostrophes). – egreg Jan 19 '17 at 23:35
2

Your problem has nothing to do with the quotation marks, it happens also without them.

Looks like (La)TeX does not know how the hyphenate the word quenched.

Your options are:

  • provide an hypenation aid: quen\-ched

  • put a \linebreak[3] before the word quenched so that LaTeX prefers to put a line break there.

Why don’t you also explain how you can be certain that (La)TeX doesn’t know how to hyphenate the word “quenched”? I think that a mention of the \showhyphens command would add value to your answer, would be appreciated by the OP, and would help other users who, experiencing a similar problem in the future, could read it. – Gustavo Mezzetti

You can check the hyphenation points (La)TeX recognizes by adding \showhyphens{quenched}. This will write possible hyphenation points into the console log.

The package {showhyphens} can be added to see all possible hyphenation points in the document itself, but this requires to compile with LuaLaTeX.

|improve this answer|||||
  • hyphenating "quenched" is seen in english only in poetry, and then probably not later than early 20th century. – barbara beeton Jan 19 '17 at 21:35
  • Why don’t you also explain how you can be certain that (La)TeX doesn’t know how to hyphenate the word “quenched”? I think that a mention of the \showhyphens command would add value to your answer, would be appreciated by the OP, and would help other users who, experiencing a similar problem in the future, could read it. – GuM Jan 19 '17 at 23:18
  • @barbarabeeton This reminds me of Dr. Treemunch. ;-) I'd say that, in a real emergency, quench\-ed might fit. However, this should be a very last time decision: a small change to the paragraph could make it irrelevant or even bad. – egreg Jan 19 '17 at 23:38

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