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I've been using lowercase roman numerals in parentheses to number certain things, and noticed that when I switched to Latin Modern, they looked rather different. LM has a larger dot over the italic i, presumably to match the upright/roman, which makes sense, and I appreciate this for words set in italics, but for roman numerals, I lean more toward matching the math font. And the LM math font does indeed have a smaller dot over the i (although it's still a bit larger than the CM one, as far as I can tell—which is perfectly fine with me).

As an example, take the number 2 (hard-coded, though normally it'd come from a counter, of course):

\documentclass[border=4pt]{standalone}
\begin{document}
(\textit{ii})
\end{document}

Roman numeral ii in parentheses

Now switch to Latin Modern:

\documentclass[border=4pt]{standalone}
\usepackage{lmodern}
\begin{document}
(\textit{ii})
\end{document}

Numeral ii in Latin Modern

Simply using math mode helps with the dot issue, but then, of course, the kerning is off (as this is typeset as a product):

\documentclass[border=4pt]{standalone}
\usepackage{lmodern}
\begin{document}
($ii$)
\end{document}

Numeral ii as a product

If I try to use $\mathit{ii}$, I just end up with the text font again, which isn't all that helpful.

So: Is there a straightforward way to get \textit-style kerning with the math font (as opposed to what \mathit does)? Or is there some other obvious way of doing it? Am I just being “typographically wrong” in disliking the second example here? (I mean, I could always fix it a bit with \kern.7pt or something.)

  • I don't think there is anything easy you can do here other than switch the fonts back or kern the math font "by hand" it doesn't mean you are typographically wrong, just that you (here) prefer cm to lm. – David Carlisle Jan 22 '17 at 12:37

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