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I'd like to create some notes of Physics for a little thesis using Times Roman. I have seen one book of Physics with the following characters:

enter image description here

Is there a Times Roman-style LaTeX math font package that matches the glyphs highlighted by the red rectangles?

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    Imho your question is much to broad. You are asking to setup a full book layout which is the work of some hours -- this is not a suitable question for this site. Build the core layout yourself and then ask single questions for the parts where you don't find a solution yourself. – Ulrike Fischer Feb 23 '17 at 11:24
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    Reminds me of this earlier question. I thought i ad seen basicly the exact same question before, but i cannot find it. – Johannes_B Feb 23 '17 at 17:52
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    You are asking for the combination of all fonts in the example, that alone is too-broad in my opinion. But you are also asking about the colorboxes. Which makes it even less to the point. Some users here on TeX.SX have asked hundreds of small questions. Most of them answerable with an effort of a few minutes. – Johannes_B Feb 26 '17 at 8:04
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    What is Greek-Roman? The first 3 fonts are default. The last 4 you just load a Times clone package for. Look up the RM... one in fontname if this is a Berry font name. Which Symbol font? That one you probably just load the relevant symbol packages for. But combining CM maths and Times text is horrible. Don't do it. – cfr Feb 27 '17 at 23:26
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    But you are asking to combine CM maths and Times text. Why do you now say you don't want to? – cfr Feb 28 '17 at 19:17
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I take it that you're looking for a Times-Roman math font that closely (ideally: perfectly...) matches the shapes of four specific glyphs you've found in some document. These glyphs would be entered in a LaTeX document as \gamma, \beta, v, and \Delta, respectively.

For use with pdfLaTeX, I'm familiar with four font packages that provide a Times Roman-style math font: mtpro2, newtxmath (use the package option varvw to get the letters v and w with "rounded bottoms"), mathptmx, and txfonts. The complete mtpro2 package is not free of charge; however, its "lite" subset -- which is all that's needed to produce these four glyphs -- is free. mathptmx and txfonts actually provide both a text font and a math font.

enter image description here

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The glyphs differ not only in their shapes -- most obviously in the shape of the character v -- but also in their side-bearings. E.g., while the glyphs \gamma, \beta, and \Delta provided by the newtxmath package are pretty much identical to those provided by txfonts, their side-bearings differ considerably.

Based on these screenshots, I'd say you should be using the mtpro2 package. The newtxmath package (if the option varvw is set) is probably OK as well.

If the online typesetting service (ShareLaTeX? Overleaf?) you're using doesn't provide access to the mtpro2 package, I'd say that you may want to look into (a) setting up a full TeX distribution on your own computer and (b) downloading and installing either the lite or the full version of mtpro2.

Here's the code that produced the four screenshots; un-comment one of the packages at a time in order to recreate the screenshots shown above.

\documentclass[border=1pt]{standalone}
\usepackage{array}

%\usepackage[lite]{mtpro2}
%\usepackage[varvw]{newtxmath}
%\usepackage{mathptmx}
\usepackage{txfonts}

\begin{document}
\begin{tabular}{@{} >{\ttfamily}p{2.75cm} p{1.15cm} p{0.9cm} @{}}
txfonts % select from: mtpro2[lite], newtxmath[varwv], mathptmx, txfonts
& $\gamma$ $\beta $ $v$ $\Delta$ & $\gamma\beta v\Delta$
\end{tabular}
\end{document}

Addendum, to address the OP's follow-up query: Here's an excerpt from page 7 of the user guide of MathTime Professional II font package, regarding the package's calligraphic math alphabets:

enter image description here

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    +1 There is also the varg and varvw options to newtxmath... – Andrew Swann Mar 3 '17 at 8:38
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    @AndrewSwann - Excellent point! Indeed, if newtxmath is loaded with the option varvw, the bottom of the v glyph is round rather than pointed. (The "entrance point" of the variant-v glyph is still pointed, though, unlike what's produced by the mtpro2 package.) – Mico Mar 3 '17 at 8:52
  • @Mico Thanks a lot lot lot. Thanks for your very precious response. I have voted my question almost always negative. I tried with Overleaf and mtpro2 works well. I must still download MiKTeX, install the editor, Ghostscript, etc..ma in this period I am very busy at school with my students. Thanks to everybody. – Sebastiano Mar 3 '17 at 9:09
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    @AndrewSwann - I've updated the MWE to show the output of newtxmath with the varvw option enabled. IMNSHO, the variant v and w glyphs of newtxmath are undistinguished hybrids of two distinct styles: (a) the "mtpro2 style", in which the glyphs have rounded entries and curves at the baseline, and (b) the txfonts/mathptmx style, in which the glyphs have sharp corners both at the entry points and where they touch the baseline. In my view, the glyphs should use either rounded curves or sharp corners in both areas; mixing the styles looks too much like, well, a mixture... – Mico Mar 3 '17 at 18:15
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    @Sebastiano - It works because the fontshape for \mathcal comes from Computer Modern (CM). That's precisely what I wrote in my previous comment, no? You may easily verify that the output of $\mathcal{A}$ is the same whether or not the "lite" subset of mtpro2 is loaded. – Mico Mar 15 '17 at 18:24
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The fonts you show are just Times Roman, plus the commercial MathTime font, a subset of mathtime is available but not in texlive as it doesn't have a free licence. So here I use another math font based on math italic from the newtxmath package. Similarly I'm using the newtxtext Times Roman clone.

As you (still) hadn't provided an example, I made up some text.

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{newtxtext,newtxmath}

\begin{document}

something \textbf{bold} and \textbf{\textit{bold italic}}

$v/c$

and
\[
\gamma=\frac{1}{\sqrt{1-\beta^2}}
\]
and
$\pi^0\rightarrow\gamma+\gamma$

\end{document}

enter image description here

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  • Dear David all perfect but the v (italic and bold) and \pi are different. These should match the fonts RMTMI font: ctan.org/tex-archive/fonts/mt11p?lang=en. But \usepackage {mathptmx} can be used for v and \pi? – Sebastiano Feb 28 '17 at 21:01
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    @Sebastiano use mathptmx instead of newtxmath if you prefer, there are by now lots of times clones available, just pick one you like, generally newtxmath is a more coherent set that mathptm which was mainly aimed at the capabilities of 1990's laser writers and the times roman and symbol fonts built in to those devices, if you prefer that font use it. but mathptmx has no bold math, as I recall. – David Carlisle Feb 28 '17 at 21:03
  • Dearest David, but for v (italic and bold) and \pi (same style of the pictures) there are the fonts? – Sebastiano Feb 28 '17 at 21:11
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    @Sebastiano i have no idea what font that is, you could try other fonts as well as I could:-) What is wrong with the newtxmath fonts, I'd just use that package and call it done. – David Carlisle Feb 28 '17 at 21:15
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    @Sebastiano I don't see how whether you use miktex or overleaf has any connection with making an example to put in a question. Sorry I consider this question closed, if you need to ask more, better open a new question. – David Carlisle Mar 2 '17 at 16:03
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If you can compile with xelatex or lualatex you could also try the TeX Gyre Termes fonts, which are based on Time New Roman, and provide support for Unicode Math.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{mathtools}
\usepackage{unicode-math}
\setmainfont{TeX Gyre Termes}
\setmathfont{TeX Gyre Termes Math}
\begin{document}

I'd like to create some notes of Physics for a little thesis using Times Roman. I
have seen one book of Physics with the following characters:
\[
    γ = \frac{1}{\sqrt{1-β^2}} = \frac{1}{\sqrt{1-(v/c)^2}}
\]
And this: $π^0\to γ+γ$ as well as:
\[
    Δt = γΔt_0\quad\text{time dilation}
\]
\end{document}

enter image description here

I'm not sure I really like the Greek characters very much, but others might.

You also (of course) need to be using an editor that supports Unicode text. I use MacVim, and I have a custom keyboard layout that I use for maths, which has all the characters I regularly use.

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