6

I'm posting here because I couldn't find a solution to my problem on the internet. Actually, I'm working on a project and I want to make a beautiful report. But When I use the \begin{equation} module, the block is centered and every pair of braces are unaligned:

\begin{equation}
    \left\{\begin{aligned}
    T_{Y} &= aaaaaaa\\
    MF_{z}&= bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb
    \end{aligned}\right.
\end{equation}

\begin{equation}
    \left\{\begin{aligned}
    T_{Y} &= aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa\\
    MF_{z}&= bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb\\
    \end{aligned}\right.
\end{equation}

\begin{equation}
    \left\{\begin{aligned}
    T_{Y} &= aaaaaaaaaaaaaa\\
    MF_{z}&= bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb\\
    \end{aligned}\right.
\end{equation}

enter image description here

I have tried eqnarray module but the equation are closer, smaller and it is not as good as equation module. Maybe it would be much better if braces are left flushed? Can someone help me?

Thank you very much :).

  • See tex.stackexchange.com/questions/196 for alternatives. – JPi Mar 13 '17 at 8:45
  • 1
    Welcome to TeX - LaTeX! There is a fleqn option for several documentclasses that places displayed equations flush left + a margin specified by \mathindent. Otherwise have a look at the math alignment blocks from the amsmath package. – Andrew Swann Mar 13 '17 at 8:45
10

One elegant solution could be a combination of the align and cases environment of the -class. For optionally text inbetween you can use intertext:

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{amsmath}

\begin{document}

\begin{align} 
&   \begin{cases}
    T_{Y} &= aaaaaaa\\
    \mathit{MF}_{z}&= bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb
    \end{cases} \\ 
&   \begin{cases}
    T_{Y} &= aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa\\
    \mathit{MF}_{z}&= bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb
    \end{cases}
    \\ 
\intertext{Some text}
&   \begin{cases}
    T_{Y} &= aaaaaaaaaaaaaa\\
    \mathit{MF}_{z}&= bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb
    \end{cases}
\end{align}

\end{document}

enter image description here

PS: Using \mathit{..} (thanks to @egreg) you can add some negative space between M and F as I interpeted it as a double-digit variable, so it should be typeset like one.

  • If you want MF to be a two-letter variable, it should be \mathit{MF} rather than the kludgy M\!F. – egreg Mar 13 '17 at 11:59
  • @egreg thanks for that advice! I didn't know \mathit would have such an effect. – thewaywewalk Mar 13 '17 at 14:01

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