16

the y-axis of my diagram uses small numbers like 0,005. I don't want to use a multiplier like 10^-3 which appears by default. If I remove it with

scaled x ticks = false, x tick label style={/pgf/number format/fixed},

the tick labels are not accurate enough and show ony 0 or 0,1:

enter image description here

Code used:

\begin{tikzpicture}
\begin{axis}[%
scaled x ticks = false,
x tick label style={/pgf/number format/fixed},
scaled y ticks = false,
scale only axis,
width=6cm,
height=5cm,
xmin=0, xmax=30000,
ymin=-0.001, ymax=0.006,
ymajorgrids,
axis on top]

How can i get this right?

1
  • By indenting code with four spaces you get a code block, as I did in my edit. When pasting in code, you can select the entire block and hit Ctrl + K (or click the {} button above the text field) to get everything indented. Also, it's always best to provide a complete, compilable, yet minimal example, a minimal working example (MWE). Nov 23, 2011 at 15:23

1 Answer 1

24

Try adding

yticklabel style={/pgf/number format/fixed,
                  /pgf/number format/precision=3}

as an option to the axis.

enter image description here

Left, with /pgf/number format/precision=3, right without. Complete code:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{pgfplots}
\begin{document}
\begin{tikzpicture}
\begin{axis}[%
   scaled x ticks = false,
   x tick label style={/pgf/number format/fixed},
   scaled y ticks = false,
   yticklabel style={/pgf/number format/fixed,
                     /pgf/number format/precision=3},
   scale only axis,
   width=6cm,
   height=5cm,
   ymajorgrids,
   axis on top]
      \addplot coordinates {(0,0) (0.2,0.01)};
\end{axis}
\end{tikzpicture}
\begin{tikzpicture}
\begin{axis}[%
   scaled x ticks = false,
   x tick label style={/pgf/number format/fixed},
   scaled y ticks = false,
   yticklabel style={/pgf/number format/fixed},
   scale only axis,
   width=6cm,
   height=5cm,
   ymajorgrids,
   axis on top]
     \addplot coordinates {(0,0) (0.2,0.01)};
\end{axis}
\end{tikzpicture}
\end{document}
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