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I want to position text further in the right in Beamer. For example I have a first line and I want the second line to begin somewhere in the middle below the second line.

Till now I have been using the command \,\,\, in math mode many times but this is not really efficient. Is there some other command I can use?

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    We really need to see a small bit of compileable code to best assess what might be done (for example, using an align environment). However, short of that, quad provides a bigger space than \, and \qquad even bigger. – Steven B. Segletes Mar 27 '17 at 10:23
  • Hi, no there is no align environment. Just "plain text". – Marion Mar 27 '17 at 10:43
  • Have you tried \quad and \qquad? – Mico Mar 27 '17 at 10:43
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    Wait, did you use $\,\,\,$ to move normal text to the right? If so, try using \hspace*{1cm}. That might be more convenient. – Skillmon Mar 27 '17 at 10:45
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    Also there is an enviroment called tabbing which might be more convenient if you want several lines on the same slide to be indented. – Skillmon Mar 27 '17 at 10:53
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If \quad and \qquad don't produce enough indentation, you should try \hspace{<some length>}, where <some length> would ideally be a fraction of \textwidth, say, 0.2\textwidth or 0.333\textwidth.

A full MWE (minimum working example):

\documentclass{beamer}
\begin{document}
\begin{frame}
some text

\quad some text

\qquad some text

\hspace{0.2\textwidth} some more text

\hspace{0.333\textwidth} still more text

\hspace{0.5\textwidth} still more text
\end{frame}
\end{document}
  • You forgot to show the usage of tabbing if you want to encapsulate all comments into this answer. – Skillmon Mar 27 '17 at 11:03
  • @Skillmon - Thanks for this. It actually isn't clear to me what the OP's use case is. Hence, I can't tell if a tabbing environment would be useful -- or, rather, overkill. – Mico Mar 27 '17 at 11:17

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