2

I was using newtxmath with the libertine option (so Linux Libertine) with pdflatex engine before, but switched to unicode-math in xelatex.

newtxmath provided me with a nice open italic g, which seem to be the preferred form for mathematics. I don't know how to get that with unicode-math and the Libertinus math font (best choice for Linux Libertine). I dug in newtxmath.sty but couldn't find any useful information of what the package does to get the open g. I searched through Linux Libertine glyph tables and couldn't find it either.


pdflatex MWE with the desired open g:

\documentclass{standalone}

\usepackage[libertine]{newtxmath}

\begin{document}
\(g\)
\end{document}

open g


xelatex / unicode-math MWE with regular g:

\documentclass{standalone}

\usepackage{unicode-math}
\setmathfont{Libertinus Math}

\begin{document}
\(g\)
\end{document}

ugly g


Possible solutions I can think of:

  • Analyse how newxmath creates the open g and use that
  • import the open g as vector graphics and make it a math letter, if possible
  • Use just the open g of Linux Libertine (if there is one) together with Libertinus.
  • There is no open g in Libertinus Math. – Henri Menke Apr 12 '17 at 21:12
  • 1
    I'm not sure that “the open form is preferred in math”. – egreg Apr 12 '17 at 21:43
  • 1
    @egreg: I found my source: the german book “Detailtypografie” has a chapter on typesetting math, made by Johannes Küster. It is stated that the open g is preferred, but it might be limited to german math typesetting ... – lblb Apr 21 '17 at 20:06
2

Imho newtxmath use this font with the option libertine for the g

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{unicode-math}
\setmathfont{Libertinus Math}
\DeclareFontFamily{OML}{nxlmi}{\skewchar \font =127}
          \DeclareFontShape{OML}{nxlmi}{m}{it}{
           <-6.3>  nxlmi035
           <6.3-8.6> nxlmi037
           <8.6->  nxlmi03
          }{}
 \DeclareSymbolFont{gletters}{OML}{nxlmi}{m}{it}
 \DeclareMathSymbol{g}{\mathalpha}{gletters}{`g}
\begin{document}
\(abc fg \) 
\end{document}

enter image description here

2

You can use the open g from newtxmath by declaring the symbol. However, the fd file includes severals \if statements which have to be declared beforehand; but the font shapes can be defined directly. (Probably doesn't work with bold math)

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{unicode-math}
\setmathfont{Libertinus Math}

\DeclareFontFamily{U}{ntxmia}{\skewchar\font=127 }
\DeclareFontShape{U}{ntxmia}{m}{it}{<->nxlmia}{}
\DeclareFontShape{U}{ntxmia}{b}{it}{<->nxlbmia}{}
\DeclareSymbolFont{lettersA}{U}{ntxmia}{m}{it}
\SetSymbolFont{lettersA}{bold}{U}{ntxmia}{b}{it}
\DeclareMathSymbol{g}{\mathord}{lettersA}{49}

\begin{document}

$\mitg$ $g$

$\mathbfit{g}$ \boldmath$g$\unboldmath

\end{document}

enter image description here

  • 2
    I've taken the liberty of modifying the code in order to avoid loading the (complicated) fd file. Feel free to revert. – egreg Apr 12 '17 at 21:42

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.