12

It is common practice in many philosophy papers to label theses singled out for analysis, like this:

enter image description here

It looks as though this effect is achieved by defining a quote-like environment. Is there some package with such an environment built-in? If not, can someone help me design an environment that will look like this? I'm new to TeX. It looks to me almost like an itemize environment, but the label is not set as far to the left. Thanks!

  • Look at enumitem. I can't remember whether I use itemize or description for this, but one or other will do it with appropriate settings. – cfr Apr 29 '17 at 4:03
  • 1
    A quote isn't really suitable as you don't want indentation on the right. – cfr Apr 29 '17 at 4:04
11

You can do that with the enumitem package by defining a new enumerate-like environment called, e.g., sensitive, which is resumed each time you use it, in this way:

\newlist{sensitive}{enumerate}{1}
\setlist[sensitive]{resume, label=(\textsc{Sensitive}$_\arabic*$), labelindent=\parindent, leftmargin=*}

and then use

\begin{sensitive}
...
\end{sensitive}

MWE:

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{enumitem}

\newlist{sensitive}{enumerate}{1}
\setlist[sensitive]{resume, label=(\textsc{Sensitive}$_\arabic*$), labelindent=\parindent, leftmargin=*}

\begin{document}

Finally, notions of sensitivity also extend to probabilistic knowledge. For instance,
Nozick 1981 states the following sensitivity condition on knowledge:
\begin{sensitive}
  \item\label{sensitive1} $S$ knows, via method (or way of believing) $M$, that $p$ only if: if $p$ 
    weren't true and $S$ were to use $M$ to arrive at a belief whether (or not) $p$, then $S$ wouldn't
    believe, via $M$, that $p$.
\end{sensitive}
The advocate of probabilistic knowledge may endorse the following deflationist variant of \ref{sensitive1}:
\begin{sensitive}
  \item\label{sensitive2} $S$ knows, via method (or way of believing) $M$, that $p$ only if: if it were
    not the case that $p$ and $S$ were to use $M$ to arrive at a belief whether (or not) $p$, then $S$
    wouldn't believe, via $M$, that $p$.
\end{sensitive}
Here again, the expressivist may capture the spirit of a statement concerning the truth
\end{document} 

Output:

enter image description here


EDIT

Otherwise, you can define a single new enumerate-like environment called, e.g., mylist and locally define the label and when to resume it, like in

\begin{mylist}[resume, label=(\textsc{Frequentist}$_\arabic*$)]

MWE:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{enumitem}

\newlist{mylist}{enumerate}{1}
\setlist[mylist]{labelindent=\parindent, leftmargin=*}

\begin{document}

Finally, notions of sensitivity also extend to probabilistic knowledge. For instance,
Nozick 1981 states the following sensitivity condition on knowledge:
\begin{mylist}[label=(\textsc{Sensitive}$_\arabic*$)]
  \item\label{sensitive1} $S$ knows, via method (or way of believing) $M$, that $p$ only if: if $p$
    weren't true and $S$ were to use $M$ to arrive at a belief whether (or not) $p$, then $S$ wouldn't
    believe, via $M$, that $p$.
\end{mylist}
The advocate of probabilistic knowledge may endorse the following deflationist variant of \ref{sensitive1}:
\begin{mylist}[resume, label=(\textsc{Sensitive}$_\arabic*$)]
  \item\label{sensitive2} $S$ knows, via method (or way of believing) $M$, that $p$ only if: if it were
    not the case that $p$ and $S$ were to use $M$ to arrive at a belief whether (or not) $p$, then $S$
    wouldn't believe, via $M$, that $p$.
\end{mylist}
Here again, the expressivist may capture the spirit of a statement concerning the truth
\begin{mylist}[label=(\textsc{Frequentist}$_\arabic*$)]
  \item\label{frequentist1} $S$ knows, via method (or way of believing) $M$, that $p$ only if: if $p$
    weren't true and $S$ were to use $M$ to arrive at a belief whether (or not) $p$, then $S$ wouldn't
    believe, via $M$, that $p$.
\end{mylist}
The advocate of probabilistic knowledge may endorse the following deflationist variant of \ref{frequentist1}:
\begin{mylist}[resume, label=(\textsc{Frequentist}$_\arabic*$)]
  \item\label{frequentist2} $S$ knows, via method (or way of believing) $M$, that $p$ only if: if it were
    not the case that $p$ and $S$ were to use $M$ to arrive at a belief whether (or not) $p$, then $S$
    wouldn't believe, via $M$, that $p$.
\end{mylist}
Here again, the expressivist may capture the spirit of a statement concerning the truth
\end{document} 

Output:

enter image description here

  • You can \usepackage{mathpazo} if you want to match the fonts in the question even more closely :-) – ShreevatsaR Apr 29 '17 at 7:11
  • 3
    @ShreevatsaR I know, but I don't think it is relevant to the answer :-) – karlkoeller Apr 29 '17 at 7:12
  • Thank you for this excellent answer, but the solution is too specific: I don't want every instance to be a variation of the word "sensitive"; I want to be able to apply different words to different theses, e.g. one might be "Frequentist" and another might be "Bayesian," rather than "Sensitive_1" and "Sensitive_2." I can't tell whether your definitions will make every label come out to be "Sensitive_n" for some n. Or is it just a coincidence you're defining the environment by the name "sensitive" (\begin{sensitive} and \end{sensitive})? – josh milligan Apr 29 '17 at 7:44
  • Basically, I need the flexibility (TeX calls this an "option," right?) to specify a different label each time I use the environment, not a fixed label with different subscripts. – josh milligan Apr 29 '17 at 7:46
  • @josh you can create a unique label inside the square brackets of \item[] – ahorn Apr 29 '17 at 7:56
9

You can define a personal environment for this:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{hyperref}

\makeatletter
\newlength{\lquotelabelwidth}
\newlength{\lquote@label@temp}
\AtEndDocument{%
  \write\@auxout{\string\global\string\lquotelabelwidth=\the\lquote@label@temp\relax}%
}

\newenvironment{lquote}[1]
 {%
  \settowidth\@tempdima{#1}%
  \addtolength\@tempdima{2pc}% <---------------- add here if you want more
  \ifdim\@tempdima>\lquote@label@temp
    \global\lquote@label@temp=\@tempdima
  \fi
  \list{}{%
    \leftmargin=\lquotelabelwidth
    \labelwidth=\leftmargin
  }%
  \csname phantomsection\endcsname % if hyperref is loaded
  \def\@currentlabel{#1}%
  \item[\textsc{(#1)}]%
 }
 {\endlist}

\newcommand{\lqref}[1]{\textup{\textsc{(\ref{#1})}}}
\makeatother

\begin{document}

Be careful that \lqref{murphy} holds.

Finally, notions of sensitivity also extend to probabilistic knowledge. 
For instance, Nozick 1981 states the following sensitivity condition on 
knowledge:
\begin{lquote}{Sensitive\textsubscript{1}}\label{sensitive1}
  $S$ knows, via method (or way of believing) $M$, that $p$ only if: if $p$ 
  weren't true and $S$ were to use $M$ to arrive at a belief whether (or not) 
  $p$, then $S$ wouldn't believe, via $M$, that~$p$.
\end{lquote}
The advocate of probabilistic knowledge may endorse the following deflationist 
variant of \lqref{sensitive1}:
\begin{lquote}{Sensitive\textsubscript{2}}\label{sensitive2}
  $S$ knows, via method (or way of believing) $M$, that $p$ only if: if it were
  not the case that $p$ and $S$ were to use $M$ to arrive at a belief whether 
  (or not) $p$, then $S$ wouldn't believe, via $M$, that~$p$.
\end{lquote}
Here again, the expressivist may capture the spirit of a statement concerning the truth
\begin{lquote}{Murphy}
\label{murphy}
  If something can go wrong, it will.
\end{lquote}

\end{document} 

This records in the .aux file the width of the longest label, so the label width can be set at the next LaTeX run. I added 2pc (24pt) for the parentheses and some more room, change to the value of your liking.

Loading hyperref is by no means mandatory; I added it to the example just for showing the code works with it.

enter image description here

1

Here's a very slightly tweaked version of one I made earlier (although not, it must be said, for quotations especially). Change the name to something which means something to you if mathau seems odd.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{enumitem}
\makeatletter
\newcommand*{\mathau}[1]{%
  \def\tempa{#1s}%
  \newlist{\tempa}{enumerate}{1}%
  \setlist[\tempa]{label={(\MakeUppercase#1\textsubscript{\arabic*})},leftmargin=*,font=\scshape,resume,ref={\MakeUppercase#1\textsubscript{\arabic*}}}}
\makeatother
\begin{document}
\mathau{sensitive}
\begin{sensitives}
  \item As any dedicated reader can clearly see, the Ideal of practical reason is a representation of, as far as I know, the things in themselves; as I have shown elsewhere, the phenomena should only be used as a canon for our understanding.
  \item As any dedicated reader can clearly see, the Ideal of practical reason is a representation of, as far as I know, the things in themselves; as I have shown elsewhere, the phenomena should only be used as a canon for our understanding.
\end{sensitives}
Some text showing the need to disambiguate various senses of `concept'.
\mathau{concept}
\begin{concepts}
  \item As any dedicated reader can clearly see, the Ideal of practical reason is a representation of, as far as I know, the things in themselves; as I have shown elsewhere, the phenomena should only be used as a canon for our understanding.
  \item As any dedicated reader can clearly see, the Ideal of practical reason is a representation of, as far as I know, the things in themselves; as I have shown elsewhere, the phenomena should only be used as a canon for our understanding.
\end{concepts}
Further discussion getting ready to return to sensitivities.
But this turns up another sense of `concept'.
\begin{concepts}
  \item As any dedicated reader can clearly see, the Ideal of practical reason is a representation of, as far as I know, the things in themselves; as I have shown elsewhere, the phenomena should only be used as a canon for our understanding.
\end{concepts}
Now we can return to the sensitivities.
\begin{sensitives}
  \item As any dedicated reader can clearly see, the Ideal of practical reason is a representation of, as far as I know, the things in themselves; as I have shown elsewhere, the phenomena should only be used as a canon for our understanding.
\end{sensitives}
Commentary.
\begin{sensitives}
  \item As any dedicated reader can clearly see, the Ideal of practical reason is a representation of, as far as I know, the things in themselves; as I have shown elsewhere, the phenomena should only be used as a canon for our understanding.
\end{sensitives}

\end{document}

mathau, tweaked

  • Could probably do with more than tweaking by now. This is one I made much, much earlier ;). – cfr Apr 30 '17 at 1:19
0

Karlkoeller gave an answer that is better for consistently horizontally aligning the list labels (e.g. the word "Frequentist" is longer than the word "Sensitive", but they both begin at the same indentation). However, I often use word labels for items in a list, and doing unique labels can be done more easily, on the fly, by putting the label inside the square brackets of \item[]. However, the method below aligns the body text of the items, not the item labels.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[osf]{mathpazo} 
\usepackage{enumitem}
\begin{document}
\setlist{labelwidth=7em, leftmargin=!}
Finally, notions of sensitivity also extend to probabilistic knowledge. For instance, {\scshape Nozick} 1981 states the following sensitivity condition on knowledge:
\begin{enumerate}
\item[\scshape (Sensitive\textsubscript 1)] $S$ knows, via method (or way of believing) $M$, that $p$ only if: if $p$ weren't true and $S$ were to use $M$ to arrive at a belief whether (or not) $p$, then $S$ wouldn't believe, via $M$, that $p$.
\end{enumerate}
The advocate of probalistic knowledge may endorse the following deflationist variant of {\scshape (Sensitive\textsubscript 1)}:
\begin{enumerate}
\item[\scshape (Sensitive\textsubscript 2)] $S$ knows, via method (or way of believing) $M$, that $p$ only if: if it were not the case that $p$ and $S$ were to use $M$ to arrive at a belief whether (or not) $p$, then $S$ wouldn't believe, via $M$, that $p$.
\end{enumerate}

\end{document}

7em was found by trial and error, but if you want to be accurate, replace 7em by calculating the length of the word label

\usepackage{calc}
%-----
\newlength\sensitive\setlength\sensitive{\widthof{\scshape (Sensitive\textsubscript 1)}}

and then

\setlist{labelwidth={\dimexpr \sensitive  +\parindent \relax}, leftmargin=!}

enter image description here

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