7

Consider the following:

\begin{equation}
\begin{split}
a & = b + c \\ & = c + d \\ & = d + e
\end{split}
\end{equation}

which outputs

enter image description here

I want to do this so that the equation label (39) is only attached the the final equation, d+e.

How do I go about doing this?

2
  • Should placing the equation number next to the last row be done for all multi-row equations, or should this be done on a case by case basis?
    – Mico
    May 5 '17 at 22:28
  • It should be done for all multi-row equations. It's bad practice to have multiple equations numbered with the same reference, which would technically be the case here.
    – ODP
    May 6 '17 at 15:41
9

You seem to be wanting to load amsmath with the tbtags option:

\documentclass[twocolumn]{article}
\usepackage[tbtags]{amsmath}

\begin{document}

\begin{equation}
\begin{split}
a & = b + c \\ & = c + d \\ & = d + e
\end{split}
\end{equation}

\end{document}

(Note: twocolumn is just for making a smaller picture.)

enter image description here

7

The tbtags option for amsmath does just that:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[tbtags]{amsmath}
\begin{document}
\begin{equation}
\begin{split}
a & = b + c \\ & = c + d \\ & = d + e
\end{split}
\end{equation}
\end{document}

Note that if you'd want to place equation numbers to the left (with option leqno), they'll go to the top of split automatically.

5

Instead of a {split} environment, use an {aligned}[b] environment; no other changes needed.

\begin{equation}
\begin{aligned}[b]
a & = b + c \\ & = c + d \\ & = d + e
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}
4
\begin{align}
a & = b + c \nonumber\\ & = c + d \nonumber\\ & = d + e
\end{align}
3

Instead split (which has one number vertical centered) you should use align where you allow to number only last line of equation:

\begin{align}
a & = b + c \notag   \\ 
  & = c + d \notag   \\ 
  & = d + e
\end{align}

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