6

This question led to a new feature in a package:
quoting

Suppose I have a very long sentence of law text that I need to have in my document.

And according to the XYZ law:

Aaaaaa aoe oa ao oa oa aou oauoaeuoae uao aaaaaa aoe oa ao oa oa aou oauoaeuoae uao aaaaaa aoe oa ao oa oa aou oauoaeuoae uao aaaaaa aoe oa ao oa oa aou oauoaeuoae uao aaaaaa aoe oa ao oa oa aou oauoaeuoae uao aaaaaa aoe oa ao oa oa aou oauoaeuoae uao aaaaaa aoe oa ao oa oa aou ... aaaaaa aoe oa ao oa oa aou oauoaeuoae uao aaaaaa aoe oa ao oa oa aou oauoaeuoae uao aaaaaa aoe oa ao oa oa ou oauoaeuoae uao aaaaaa aoe oa ao oa oa aou oauoaeuoae uao aaaaaa aoe oa ao oa oa aou oauoaeuoae uao aaaaaa aoe oa ao oa oa aou oauoaeuoae uao aaaaaa aoe oa ao oa oa aou oauoaeuoae uao.

How can I indent that clearly with italics and proper citations to make it clear that it is not my writing?

6
  • Can you elaborate on what you meant with proper citations?
    – percusse
    Dec 3 '11 at 3:01
  • @percusse: I don't know. Is this not a bazaar where sellers augment the wants of the buyer and the buyer will select the winner? Proper citation in this case is a term to do things as well as possible (one answer already got into it). Sorry for me it is hard to know how to do this well, I just know that I want to improve with this thing...
    – hhh
    Dec 3 '11 at 3:24
  • Maybe it's my english that I did not get it in the first place and no, this is no bazaar here. No rewards, no competition just people helping each other.
    – percusse
    Dec 3 '11 at 4:08
  • @percusse: the whole SE is an example of a bazaar, this term is not now the normal fruit-vegetable-type-of-thing but the concept explained further in this book here, more here. This is a realization of a dream where people collaborate and help one another openly, it is not a place for Caste -system but a place for openness and honesty. I don't know, no pretending.
    – hhh
    Dec 3 '11 at 4:35
  • What happened to buyers and winners in this dream then? I don't get the relevance. Anyway no point extending this off-topic discussion. Sorry for the question.
    – percusse
    Dec 3 '11 at 4:51
11

The basic approach would be to use the standard quote or quotation environments, with a proper redefinition to italicize the text; something along these lines:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}

\makeatletter
\g@addto@macro\quote\itshape
\g@addto@macro\quotation\itshape
\makeatother

\newcommand\Text{Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Ut purus elit,
vestibulum ut, placerat ac, adipiscing vitae, felis. Curabitur dictum gravida
mauris. Nam arcu libero, nonummy eget, consectetuer id, vulputate a, magna.
Donec vehicula augue eu neque. Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus
et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Mauris ut leo.}

\begin{document}

\Text\begin{quote}
``\Text''
\end{quote}
\Text
\begin{quotation}
``\Text''
\end{quotation}

\end{document}

If you want further customization, the csquotes package could be of interest.

enter image description here

8
  • ..precisely, thank you. How did I get lost with this command in googling?! I found a lot of things about CSquotes (never got it working). Thanks, this simplified things a lot!
    – hhh
    Dec 3 '11 at 3:30
  • Sorry but how did you get the italics there? No emph -block?
    – hhh
    Dec 3 '11 at 3:33
  • 2
    @hhh Notice that Gonzalo added itshape to the definitions of quote and quotation. This is where the italics come from. \itshape is a switch whereas \emph{} is a command that takes an argument.
    – Alan Munn
    Dec 3 '11 at 3:40
  • @AlanMunn: what is the "makeatletter" -thing? Ok, I found something here-- not yet fully comprehended this, thinking. A lot of small details such as \g, new to me.
    – hhh
    Dec 3 '11 at 3:45
  • 1
    The name of the command is \g@addto@macro (i.e. \g is not a separate part, and (as the link you found says) the @ is just a character that is reserved for internal macros.
    – Alan Munn
    Dec 3 '11 at 4:04
5

My solution differs from Gonzalo's in two respects:

  • Instead of switching between the quote and quotation environments, I use my quoting package and its environment of the same name. First-line indentation is controlled by adding a blank line before the environment. Italic font is achieved with the package option font=itshape.

  • I do no add `` and '' several times in the text, but use the etoolbox package to patch the beginning and the end of the quoting environment. This way, one doesn't have to hunt down every instance of quotings in the text if one wants the change the environment's definition. EDIT: With quoting v 0.1b, one may simply use the begintext and endtext options.


\documentclass{article}

\usepackage[font=itshape,begintext=``,endtext='']{quoting}

\newcommand\Text{Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Ut purus elit,
vestibulum ut, placerat ac, adipiscing vitae, felis. Curabitur dictum gravida
mauris. Nam arcu libero, nonummy eget, consectetuer id, vulputate a, magna.
Donec vehicula augue eu neque. Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus
et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Mauris ut leo.}

\begin{document}

\Text
% <--- No first-line indentation of "quoting"
\begin{quoting}
\Text
\end{quoting}
% <--- No indentation after "quoting"
\Text

\begin{quoting}
\Text
\end{quoting}

\end{document}

enter image description here

3
  • That's really nice, any chance of getting @daleif to incorporate it into memoir? (:-). On a more serious note, how would that handle Mark's inner \emph? Dec 3 '11 at 13:13
  • 1
    @Brent.Longborough: With \itshape in force, \emph should switch to upright text.
    – lockstep
    Dec 3 '11 at 13:16
  • 1
    I really envy you your brilliance!!! {:-) Dec 3 '11 at 13:19
5

I know this is answered, but I prefer the epigraph package. Put something like the following in your preamble

\usepackage{epigraph}
\setlength{\epigraphwidth}{0.90\textwidth}

And invoke with something like the following

\epigraph
{\itshape\ldots we \emph{never} experiment with just \emph{one} electron or atom or (small) molecule. In thought-experiments we sometimes assume that we do; this invariably entails ridiculous consequences\ldots}
{\emph{Are There Quantum Jumps? Part II}\\ Erwin Schr\"odinger}

Which will give you something like this

enter image description here

8
  • You can be as grumpy as you like. The package is well documented and may offer an alternative route for correct emphasis. Of course, you don't need to emphasise at all when its so clearly a quotation.
    – qubyte
    Dec 3 '11 at 11:11
  • In addition, de-emphasis is the stadard way of emphasising in already emphasised text, so I think it's fairly clear. Of course, if you have a better way of emphasising and de-emphasising that fits here, I'll be happy to update my example. ;)
    – qubyte
    Dec 3 '11 at 11:17
  • OK, sorry, I've deleted the grumpy comment. But my "moan" wasn't about the package, just the use of \emph for something that wasn't actually emphasis... Dec 3 '11 at 13:06
  • There was no need to delete it. If you know a better way, I really am all ears, or eyes...
    – qubyte
    Dec 3 '11 at 13:35
  • I could swap out the first \emph{...} for an \itshape as mentioned above. Would that look better?
    – qubyte
    Dec 3 '11 at 13:37

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