15

I really want to use the following overleaf template: https://www.overleaf.com/latex/examples/sample-apa-paper/wbzdqpgxszqs#.WRby39zfPIV (Sample APA paper) But unfortunately, the text is left rigged and I want it to be justified. I assumed that justified text is latex's default, so I concluded that in this template leftrigged must be on but I cannot find it. Does someone know a solution?

5
  • Welcome, that isn't a template, it is an example by someone. Even if it would be a template, there would be no warranty for it to work or beeing correct.
    – Johannes_B
    May 13, 2017 at 11:55
  • You want to write a document according to the rules of the american psychological association?
    – Johannes_B
    May 13, 2017 at 11:56
  • oh I'm sorry, it said template on the link, so I just took that expression.
    – Maria
    May 13, 2017 at 11:57
  • @Johannes_B yes, exactly and I like the exact layout of the example, so I would want to use it but I need a justified layout
    – Maria
    May 13, 2017 at 11:58
  • 1
    Check the rules, APA defines a ragged text. You can try package ragged2e and the command \justifying to get an almost APA document.
    – Johannes_B
    May 13, 2017 at 12:06

5 Answers 5

24

APA guidelines require ragged papers. If you want your text to be justified, you will not get a document complying to APA rules, but a close hit.

Add to your document preamble:

\usepackage{ragged2e}
\justifying
1
  • Should provide details as in reply from Nazehs below.
    – Samir
    Jun 13, 2021 at 15:45
12

Add \usepackage{ragged2e} to the preamble and use \justify{ text } wherever you want to justify the text.

4
  • Welcome to TeX.SX! This answer is probably problematic for whole documents (not for pieces of text). Maybe you could add a general explanation.
    – TeXnician
    Jun 16, 2017 at 4:24
  • 1
    justify is an environment, not a command.
    – Johannes_B
    Jul 16, 2017 at 6:11
  • @Johannes_B This somehow worked for me, while your answer did not do anything. Oct 12, 2020 at 8:09
  • 5
    Sorry this answer is wrong \justify should be used as \begin{justify} and if used as in this answer it will apply to the rest of the document not just { text } Feb 9, 2021 at 22:40
10

import the below on the preamble section

\usepackage[document]{ragged2e}

targeted text goes here...

\begin{justify}

text goes here...

\end{justify}

or you can use below to apply to the blocks/text after the command

\justify

0
  1. The following code insert a tabulation at the beginning of the text

    \justifying or \justifying{ text }

  2. The following code justify both sides (no tabulation)

    justify

0
  1. Add before the apa document class definition: \renewcommand{\raggedright}{}. For example:
\renewcommand{\raggedright}{}
\documentclass[man]{apa6}
\usepackage{biblatex}
\usepackage{lipsum} 
\title{Justifying text in APA6 Class Document}
\shorttitle{APA Justify}
\author{Name}
\affiliation{School}
\abstract{\lipsum[0-1]}
\keywords{APA style, demonstration, justify}
\begin{document}
\maketitle
\lipsum[0-3]
\lipsum[0-2]
\end{document}

This'll justify the text (see picture) by essentially removing the \raggedright declaration, and therefore making it unavailable throughout the document.

enter image description here

  1. (Not recommended) Locate and comment out any instance of \raggedright in the apa class definition (something like: ../tex/latex/apa6.cls, path will depend on where you keep latex files stored), which will leave the declaration available in case it's needed.
2
  • Welcome to TeX.SE! Have you tried this with an compilable example? Can you add the code? Result?
    – Mensch
    Apr 3 at 13:05
  • Servus Mensch, thank you! Sure, I'll add a minimal example and a screenshot. Cheers.
    – wamirez
    Apr 11 at 12:58

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .