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in my LaTeX report, I would like to separate paragraphs by a small vertical blank space. I'm doing that by typing

End of the old paragraph. \newline

New paragraph goes here.

This worked well for most of the cases. However, there is one particular chapter where this procedure produces extremely large vertical blank spaces.

The chapter looks like this:

\begin{figure}[ht]
% Figure with subfigures
\end{figure}

First paragraph. \newline

Second paragraph. \newline

Third paragraph. \newline

Fourth paragraph.

However, this results in rediculously large blank spaces. How can I fix this? I have the feeling that this is not the best approach to divide paragraphs. What is the "optimum" way to do it? I do not want a space at the beginning of a paragraph.

  • Welcome to TeX.SX! Since the currently given answers do not work for you and seem to work differently, please add a minimal working example (MWE) that illustrates your problem. Reproducing the problem and finding out what the issue is will be much easier when we see compilable code, starting with \documentclass{...} and ending with \end{document}. – Moriambar May 20 '17 at 13:53
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    Don't use \newline at the and of a paragraph. This leads to an extra empty line at the end of the paragraph and the warning Underfull \hbox (badness 10000) in paragraph at lines ... If you want space between paragraphs then use the parskip package (or if you're using a KOMA-Script class the parskip option). – clemens May 20 '17 at 13:57
  • the \newline commands are completely wrong in that position, just add \usepackage{parskip} to set \parskip to some none zero value. – David Carlisle May 20 '17 at 13:58
  • Thank you! I'll check out the parskip package! – Dmitrii C. May 20 '17 at 13:59
  • related/duplicate: tex.stackexchange.com/questions/36423 – clemens May 20 '17 at 14:00
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You don't have to manually typeout the \newline command. LaTeX and TeX related systems automatically consider a blank line as an end of a paragraph. you have extra space because you force a line break and then also break a paragraph.

\documentclass{article}
\begin{document}
First paragraph. 

Second paragraph. 

Third paragraph. 

Fourth paragraph.
\end{document}

gives out:

enter image description here

The effect is more apparent with some lines of text

\documentclass{article}
\begin{document}
First paragraph. First paragraph. First paragraph. First paragraph. First paragraph. First paragraph. First paragraph. First paragraph. 

Second paragraph. Second paragraph. Second paragraph. Second paragraph. Second paragraph. Second paragraph. Second paragraph. Second paragraph. Second paragraph. Second paragraph. Second paragraph. 

Third paragraph. Third paragraph. Third paragraph. Third paragraph. Third paragraph. Third paragraph. Third paragraph. Third paragraph. Third paragraph. Third paragraph. 

Fourth paragraph.
\end{document}

You could also manually specify an extra skip to be inserted (suitable for occasional spacings, not systematic), with smallskip medskip or bigskip ie

\documentclass{article}
\begin{document}
First paragraph. \medskip

Second paragraph. \smallskip

Third paragraph. \bigskip

Fourth paragraph.
\end{document}

which gives:

enter image description here

Also, as Steven B. Segletes suggests, you could define, in your preamble, the parskip to be a specific amount,ie \parskip=1ex\relax

  • Thanks for the hint. However, omitting the \newline makes the blank space even bigger (at least visually). – Dmitrii C. May 20 '17 at 13:49
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    @DmitriiC. You then have to create a minimal working example from documentclass to end{document} to replicate the problem – Moriambar May 20 '17 at 13:52
  • I've tried to, but I'm not able to reproduce the problem. However... I have absolutely no clue why, but putting\raggedbottom in front of the problematic chapter did the trick... – Dmitrii C. May 20 '17 at 13:57
  • Don't forget the specification on a nonzero \parskip=1ex\relax, for example, to accomplish the goal, as well. – Steven B. Segletes May 20 '17 at 17:01

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