6

Regarding LaTeX: Numero sign ('№'), would

N\textsuperscript{\underline{\scriptsize o}}

be a valid alternative to \textnumero (from textcomp package)? I prefer a numero sign that matches the font used for the surrounding text, although this is apparently not the preference of some fontographers (see Times New Roman).

5
  • 1
    Which font do you use?
    – Bernard
    Jun 20, 2017 at 12:08
  • Though this might be an abuse of \b, N\textsuperscript{\b{o}} might also be a valid alternative.
    – campa
    Jun 20, 2017 at 12:24
  • textcomp doesn't provide any symbols itself. The symbol shown there is not from the package. Rather, the package is providing access to the symbol in the currently active font. (At least, it will do this where a suitable font exists. I'm not sure what exactly it does if there's no font available at all. Probably then it will fall back to Computer Modern.)
    – cfr
    Jun 20, 2017 at 12:39
  • 1
    The discussion on the Irish "Mc" may be relevant here: tex.stackexchange.com/questions/364024/… Jun 20, 2017 at 18:04
  • In answer to the question of @bernard, I have been using Computer Modern (or the version provided by fix-cm). Sometimes Adobe Times or Adobe Helvetica (\fontfamily{ptm}...).
    – Ana Nimbus
    Jul 5, 2017 at 4:29

3 Answers 3

6

Taking a lead from the ALTERNATIVE APPROACH in my answer at Scots-Irish American surnames: Mc - how to achieve a range of aesthetically appealing raised-c with underscore?...

The optional argument sets the gap between the "o" and underscore.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{stackengine,graphicx}
\newcommand\No[1][.13ex]{%
  \setbox0=\hbox{\scalebox{.7}{o}}%
  \setbox2=\hbox{N}%
  N\kern-.05em\stackengine{\dimexpr\ht0-\ht2+#1}{\belowbaseline[-\ht2]{\copy0}}%
    {\rule[-.13ex]{.7\wd0}{.13ex}}%
    {U}{c}{F}{F}{L}%
}

\begin{document}
\No 3

\LARGE\No[.2ex]3

\sffamily

\No 3

\normalsize \No 3
\end{document}

enter image description here

3
  • 1
    Excellent answer. Note that (as I've just discovered), loading \usepackage[french]{babel} will lead to a conflict since that defines a \No command already. Presumably many users of babel/french would know that, but I'm quite ignorant.
    – PatrickT
    Jan 14 at 1:29
  • 1
    Thank you, @PatrickT, for noting that conflict, which was unknown to me. Obviously, the solution is to give the macro a different name. Jan 14 at 1:33
  • Indeed I went for \Numero :-)
    – PatrickT
    Jan 14 at 2:02
3

textcomp just takes glyph 155 (octal 233) from TS1 in computer modern, which gives the symbol you don't like.

See e.g. the LaTeX font encodings document; the relevant page is below.

enter image description here

And no, I don't have any objection to your choice, but as cfr observes, this glyph is part of the font.

2

In response to the comment, showing the plain, manually-constructed, form in blue (without any additional kerning, raiseboxes etc), to compare against the font designer's version:

fonts

Legacy fonts would require much more work (TS1 vs T1 encodings, kerning, resizes, etc):

fonts legacy

MWE

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[table]{xcolor}
\usepackage{fontspec} 

\setmainfont{Noto Serif}
\newcommand\nhead{\rowcolor{blue!12}}
\newcommand\propsol{{\color{blue}N\textsuperscript{\underline{\scriptsize o}}}}
\newcommand\legpropsol{{\usefont{T1}{lmr}{m}{n}\color{blue}[N\textsuperscript{\underline{\scriptsize o}}]}}
\newcommand\mytext{text № [\propsol] 3 text}
\newfontfamily\ffonta{Book Antiqua}
%\newfontfamily\ffontb{Commissioner-Regular.ttf}
\newfontfamily\ffontc{Cormorant Garamond}
\newfontfamily\ffontd{Cormorant Infant}
\newfontfamily\ffonte{Cormorant SC}
\newfontfamily\ffontf{DejaVu Sans}
\newfontfamily\ffontg{DejaVu Sans Mono}
\newfontfamily\ffonth{DejaVu Serif}
\newfontfamily\ffonti{Doulos SIL}
%\newfontfamily\ffontj{Exo 2}
\newfontfamily\ffontk{FreeMono}
\newfontfamily\ffontl{FreeSans}
\newfontfamily\ffontm{FreeSerif}
\newfontfamily\ffontn{Gentium Plus}
\newfontfamily\ffonto{IBM Plex Mono}
\newfontfamily\ffontp{IBM Plex Sans}
\newfontfamily\ffontq{IBM Plex Serif}
\newfontfamily\ffontr{Liberation Mono}
\newfontfamily\ffonts{Liberation Sans}
\newfontfamily\ffontt{Liberation Serif}
\newfontfamily\ffontu{Linux Biolinum G}
\newfontfamily\ffontv{Linux Libertine Display G}
\newfontfamily\ffontw{Linux Libertine G}
\newfontfamily\ffontx{Noto Mono}
\newfontfamily\ffonty{Noto Sans}
\newfontfamily\ffontz{Noto Sans Display}
\newfontfamily\ffontaa{Noto Serif}
\newfontfamily\ffontab{Noto Serif Display}
\newfontfamily\ffontac{Roboto}
\newfontfamily\ffontad{Source Code Pro}
\newfontfamily\ffontae{Source Sans Pro}
\newfontfamily\ffontaf{Source Serif Pro}

\newcommand\legfont[2]{%
\usefont{T1}{#1}{m}{#2}text \usefont{TS1}{#1}{m}{#2}\char"9B  \legpropsol \usefont{T1}{#1}{m}{#2}\ 3 text
}

\begin{document}

Unicode glyph [plus manually constructed form]

U+2116 № [\verb|N\textsuperscript{\underline{\scriptsize o}}|]

\bigskip
\noindent\begin{tabular}{lll}
\nhead Font & Upright & Italic \\
Book Antiqua & \ffonta\mytext & \ffonta\textit{\mytext} \\
%Commissioner & \ffontb\mytext & \ffontb\textit{\mytext} \\
Cormorant Garamond & \ffontc\mytext & \ffontc\textit{\mytext} \\
Cormorant Infant &  & \ffontd\textit{\mytext} \\
%Cormorant SC & \ffonte\mytext & \\
DejaVu Sans & \ffontf\mytext & \ffontf\textit{\mytext} \\
DejaVu Sans Mono & \ffontg\mytext & \ffontg\textit{\mytext} \\
DejaVu Serif & \ffonth\mytext & \ffonth\textit{\mytext} \\
Doulos SIL & \ffonti\mytext &  \\
%Exo 2 & \ffontj\mytext & \ffontj\textit{\mytext} \\
FreeMono & \ffontk\mytext & \ffontk\textit{\mytext} \\
FreeSans & \ffontl\mytext & \ffontl\textit{\mytext} \\
FreeSerif & \ffontm\mytext & \ffontm\textit{\mytext} \\
Gentium Plus & \ffontn\mytext & \ffontn\textit{\mytext} \\
IBM Plex Mono & \ffonto\mytext & \ffonto\textit{\mytext} \\
IBM Plex Sans & \ffontp\mytext & \ffontp\textit{\mytext} \\
IBM Plex Serif & \ffontq\mytext & \ffontq\textit{\mytext} \\
Liberation Mono & \ffontr\mytext & \ffontr\textit{\mytext} \\
Liberation Sans & \ffonts\mytext & \ffonts\textit{\mytext} \\
Liberation Serif & \ffontt\mytext & \ffontt\textit{\mytext} \\
Linux Biolinum G & \ffontu\mytext & \ffontu\textit{\mytext} \\
Linux Libertine Display G & \ffontv\mytext & \\
Linux Libertine G & \ffontw\mytext & \ffontw\textit{\mytext} \\
Noto Mono & \ffontx\mytext &  \\
Noto Sans & \ffonty\mytext & \ffonty\textit{\mytext} \\
Noto Sans Display & \ffontz\mytext & \ffontz\textit{\mytext} \\
Noto Serif & \ffontaa\mytext & \ffontaa\textit{\mytext} \\
Noto Serif Display & \ffontab\mytext & \ffontab\textit{\mytext} \\
Roboto & \ffontac\mytext & \ffontac\textit{\mytext} \\
Source Code Pro & \ffontad\mytext & \ffontad\textit{\mytext} \\
Source Sans Pro & \ffontae\mytext & \ffontae\textit{\mytext} \\
Source Serif Pro & \ffontaf\mytext &  \\

\end{tabular}

\newpage
\usefont{T1}{lmr}{m}{n}Legacy fonts: slot 9B of TS1 encoding:  {\usefont{TS1}{lmr}{m}{n}\char"9B}

\bigskip
\begin{tabular}{lll}
\nhead Font family & Upright & Italic \\
lmr & \legfont{lmr}{n} & \legfont{lmr}{it} \\
qzc &  & \legfont{qzc}{it} \\
qtm & \legfont{qtm}{n} & \legfont{qtm}{it} \\
qpl & \legfont{qpl}{n} & \legfont{qpl}{it} \\
qhv & \legfont{qhv}{n} & \legfont{qhv}{it} \\
qcs & \legfont{qcs}{n} & \legfont{qcs}{it} \\
qcr & \legfont{qcr}{n} & \legfont{qcr}{it} \\
qbk & \legfont{qbk}{n} & \legfont{qbk}{it} \\
qag & \legfont{qag}{n} & \legfont{qag}{it} \\
stix2 & \legfont{stix2}{n} & \legfont{stix2}{it} \\
\end{tabular}

\end{document}

Original answer

The abbreviation for numero seems to be like ℜ ℞ ℃ Å ℮ ℅ ℊ, in the sense of having its own typesetting tradition, which means that making it match the surrounding text could surprise some readers.

Having said that, it is a rarely used glyph and does seem to have some free-form quality about it, almost exotic, in terms of being a little bit different from the surroundings (especially in the serif fonts) but not too different.

Unicode font sample:

unicode

Legacy font sample:

legacy font

MWE

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[table]{xcolor}
\usepackage{fontspec} 

\setmainfont{Noto Serif}
\newcommand\nhead{\rowcolor{blue!12}}
\newcommand\mytext{text № 3 text}
\newfontfamily\ffonta{Book Antiqua}
%\newfontfamily\ffontb{Commissioner-Regular.ttf}
\newfontfamily\ffontc{Cormorant Garamond}
\newfontfamily\ffontd{Cormorant Infant}
\newfontfamily\ffonte{Cormorant SC}
\newfontfamily\ffontf{DejaVu Sans}
\newfontfamily\ffontg{DejaVu Sans Mono}
\newfontfamily\ffonth{DejaVu Serif}
\newfontfamily\ffonti{Doulos SIL}
%\newfontfamily\ffontj{Exo 2}
\newfontfamily\ffontk{FreeMono}
\newfontfamily\ffontl{FreeSans}
\newfontfamily\ffontm{FreeSerif}
\newfontfamily\ffontn{Gentium Plus}
\newfontfamily\ffonto{IBM Plex Mono}
\newfontfamily\ffontp{IBM Plex Sans}
\newfontfamily\ffontq{IBM Plex Serif}
\newfontfamily\ffontr{Liberation Mono}
\newfontfamily\ffonts{Liberation Sans}
\newfontfamily\ffontt{Liberation Serif}
\newfontfamily\ffontu{Linux Biolinum G}
\newfontfamily\ffontv{Linux Libertine Display G}
\newfontfamily\ffontw{Linux Libertine G}
\newfontfamily\ffontx{Noto Mono}
\newfontfamily\ffonty{Noto Sans}
\newfontfamily\ffontz{Noto Sans Display}
\newfontfamily\ffontaa{Noto Serif}
\newfontfamily\ffontab{Noto Serif Display}
\newfontfamily\ffontac{Roboto}
\newfontfamily\ffontad{Source Code Pro}
\newfontfamily\ffontae{Source Sans Pro}
\newfontfamily\ffontaf{Source Serif Pro}

\newcommand\legfont[2]{%
\usefont{T1}{#1}{m}{#2}text \usefont{TS1}{#1}{m}{#2}\char"9B\usefont{T1}{#1}{m}{#2}\ 3 text
}

\begin{document}

U+2116 №

\bigskip
\noindent\begin{tabular}{lll}
\nhead Font & Upright & Italic \\
Book Antiqua & \ffonta\mytext & \ffonta\textit{\mytext} \\
%Commissioner & \ffontb\mytext & \ffontb\textit{\mytext} \\
Cormorant Garamond & \ffontc\mytext & \ffontc\textit{\mytext} \\
Cormorant Infant &  & \ffontd\textit{\mytext} \\
%Cormorant SC & \ffonte\mytext & \\
DejaVu Sans & \ffontf\mytext & \ffontf\textit{\mytext} \\
DejaVu Sans Mono & \ffontg\mytext & \ffontg\textit{\mytext} \\
DejaVu Serif & \ffonth\mytext & \ffonth\textit{\mytext} \\
Doulos SIL & \ffonti\mytext &  \\
%Exo 2 & \ffontj\mytext & \ffontj\textit{\mytext} \\
FreeMono & \ffontk\mytext & \ffontk\textit{\mytext} \\
FreeSans & \ffontl\mytext & \ffontl\textit{\mytext} \\
FreeSerif & \ffontm\mytext & \ffontm\textit{\mytext} \\
Gentium Plus & \ffontn\mytext & \ffontn\textit{\mytext} \\
IBM Plex Mono & \ffonto\mytext & \ffonto\textit{\mytext} \\
IBM Plex Sans & \ffontp\mytext & \ffontp\textit{\mytext} \\
IBM Plex Serif & \ffontq\mytext & \ffontq\textit{\mytext} \\
Liberation Mono & \ffontr\mytext & \ffontr\textit{\mytext} \\
Liberation Sans & \ffonts\mytext & \ffonts\textit{\mytext} \\
Liberation Serif & \ffontt\mytext & \ffontt\textit{\mytext} \\
Linux Biolinum G & \ffontu\mytext & \ffontu\textit{\mytext} \\
Linux Libertine Display G & \ffontv\mytext & \\
Linux Libertine G & \ffontw\mytext & \ffontw\textit{\mytext} \\
Noto Mono & \ffontx\mytext &  \\
Noto Sans & \ffonty\mytext & \ffonty\textit{\mytext} \\
Noto Sans Display & \ffontz\mytext & \ffontz\textit{\mytext} \\
Noto Serif & \ffontaa\mytext & \ffontaa\textit{\mytext} \\
Noto Serif Display & \ffontab\mytext & \ffontab\textit{\mytext} \\
Roboto & \ffontac\mytext & \ffontac\textit{\mytext} \\
Source Code Pro & \ffontad\mytext & \ffontad\textit{\mytext} \\
Source Sans Pro & \ffontae\mytext & \ffontae\textit{\mytext} \\
Source Serif Pro & \ffontaf\mytext &  \\

\end{tabular}

\newpage
\usefont{T1}{lmr}{m}{n}Legacy fonts: slot 9B of TS1 encoding:  {\usefont{TS1}{lmr}{m}{n}\char"9B}

\bigskip
\begin{tabular}{lll}
\nhead Font family & Upright & Italic \\
lmr & \legfont{lmr}{n} & \legfont{lmr}{it} \\
qzc &  & \legfont{qzc}{it} \\
qtm & \legfont{qtm}{n} & \legfont{qtm}{it} \\
qpl & \legfont{qpl}{n} & \legfont{qpl}{it} \\
qhv & \legfont{qhv}{n} & \legfont{qhv}{it} \\
qcs & \legfont{qcs}{n} & \legfont{qcs}{it} \\
qcr & \legfont{qcr}{n} & \legfont{qcr}{it} \\
qbk & \legfont{qbk}{n} & \legfont{qbk}{it} \\
qag & \legfont{qag}{n} & \legfont{qag}{it} \\
stix2 & \legfont{stix2}{n} & \legfont{stix2}{it} \\
\end{tabular}

\end{document}
5
  • 1
    Re: "it is a rarely used glyph:" Perhaps in English. Russian typewriters have a special "numero" key, though. See also this computer keyboard layout
    – Ana Nimbus
    Sep 26, 2021 at 21:56
  • Nice table. Could you add a column that shows what my proposed solution (N\textsuperscript{\underline{\scriptsize o}}) would look like in each of the fonts?
    – Ana Nimbus
    Sep 26, 2021 at 21:58
  • See amended answer. (Numero is one glyph in the fonts, like $, so the manually constructed form, two glyphs, looks a bit odd in some places; on the other hand, some font designers don't make it as much calligraphic as it is supposed to be, so closer to the manual shape.)
    – Cicada
    Sep 27, 2021 at 4:11
  • Yes. It used to be above 3, where # is now, on American English typewriters; English English ones had in that position, which is why some people still call # "pound (sign)".
    – Cicada
    Sep 27, 2021 at 4:17
  • Correction: keyboard/key layout was different for each model and manufacturer, so everyone's experience will vary. Typewriters were the mechanical equivalent of a font file before Unicode. :)
    – Cicada
    Sep 27, 2021 at 6:59

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