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I am trying to mark changes to a LaTeX document in a specific color, and hence need certain references in color as well. I have no idea how to achieve this, other than editing specific entries in my .bib file. This is undesirable, as I might need to use the same .bib file without this requirement in the future.

Here is what my .tex file looks like

\documentclass[aip,jcp,preprint,amssymb]{revtex4-1}
\usepackage{xcolor}
\newcommand{\mychange}[1]{{\textcolor{blue}{#1}}}
\begin{document}

I want citations `\cite{R1}`, `\cite{R2}`, and `\cite{R3}` such that `\cite{R2}` is in `\mychange{blue}`.

\bibliography{main}
\end{document}

The corresponding main.bib file looks like

@article{R1,
  Title                    = {My first reference},
  Author                   = {Author1},
  Journal                  = {Journal1},
  Year                     = {2017},
}
@article{R2,
  Title                    = {My second reference in blue},
  Author                   = {Author2 and Author3},
  Journal                  = {Journal2},
  Year                     = {2000},
}
@article{R3,
  Title                    = {My last reference},
  Author                   = {Author4},
  Journal                  = {Journal1},
  Year                     = {2010},
}

The desired output is

Desired output

I compile this using the sequence latex->bibtex->latex->latex->dvips->ps2pdf to generate the pdf.

Any ideas on how to achieve this? If at all possible, I would like to consistently use the defined \mychange{} command. I am limited to document class revtex4-1 due to requirements of the journal involved.

Note that the answer to Different style/color for some specific references using natbib compiles but does not show the required color when I remove \bibliographystyle{dcu} (and remove \usepackage{natbib}). The answer to color text in bibliography text also fails to compile when the bibtex key has numbers involved (e.g., changing the key nature to nature1980). Also, Different style/color for some specific references using Bibtex only changes the label, and not the entry.

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