1

I don't know why in my references, in the title, after a point, although I've used capitalized letter, never starts with uppercase. For ex: (look at between "media" and "fractal")

Aguilera, M., Morer, I., Barandiaran, X. E., y Bedia, M. G. (2013). Quantifying political self-organization in social media. fractal patterns in the spanish 15m movement on twitter. En G. N. S. N. P. Lio O. Miglino y M. Pavone (Eds.), Advances in articial life: Ecal 2013 (pp. 395–402).

This is my citation:

@inbook{aguilera2013quantifying,
  title={Quantifying Political Self-Organization in Social Media. Fractal patterns in the Spanish 15M movement on Twitter},
  author={Aguilera, Miguel and Morer, Ignacio and Barandiaran, Xabier E and Bedia, Manuel González},
  editor={P. Lio, O. Miglino, G. Nicosia, S. Nolfi, and M. Pavone},
  booktitle={Advances in artificial life: ECAL 2013},
  pages={395--402},
  year={2013}
}

And my document:

\documentclass{book}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage[natbibapa]{apacite}
\setcitestyle{comma}
\bibliographystyle{apacite}
\renewcommand*{\bibfont}{\raggedright}
\begin{document}

The reference \citep{aguilera2013quantifying}

\bibliography{references}
\end{document}

Any ideas?

  • 1
    Just surround the capital letters by braces: {F}ractal. – Sergei Golovan Jun 25 '17 at 18:43
1

The apacite bibliography style practices a very strong form of "sentence style": Only the very first letter of the title field, and any parts encased in curly braces, do not get converted to lowercase. Moral of the story: You must encase the words "Fractal", "Spanish", "15M", and "Twitter" in curly braces. I would also encase the acronym "ECAL" in curly braces.

A separate issue: You have a bad syntax error in the editor field: the editors must be separated by the keyword and, not by commas. The horrible appearance of "G. N. S. N. P. Lio O. Miglino y M. Pavone" should have been a warning sign that something wasn't right...

In short, the bib entry should look like this:

@inbook{aguilera2013quantifying,
  title={Quantifying Political Self-Organization in Social Media. 
      {Fractal} patterns in the {Spanish 15M} movement on {Twitter}},
  author={Aguilera, Miguel and Morer, Ignacio and Barandiaran, 
      Xabier E and Bedia, Manuel González},
  editor={P. Lio and O. Miglino and G. Nicosia and S. Nolfi and 
      M. Pavone},
  booktitle={Advances in Artificial Life: {ECAL} 2013},
  pages={395--402},
  year={2013}
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks! OMG, I should encase aprox 200 references one by one? The separate issue: you are right! I copied the bibtex form of google scholar :-( – Juan Linares Jun 26 '17 at 6:32
  • 2
    @JuanLinares - The good news that you will have to do the encasing work only once. Aside: You've (re)discovered that one must be very skeptical about all information provided by Google Scholar. Its bibliographic entries usually constitute a reasonable first start, but no more. For sure, you will have to check the correctness of all fields of each and every entry; its your absolute responsibility to do so. Simply assuming that the information is correct is a bad idea! If you were under the impression that Google Scholar information is trustworthy, you have my sincere sympathies. – Mico Jun 26 '17 at 8:08
  • Mico: You are completely right. I just caught GS reference and put it in references (in this case, others were hand made). Obviously, one must be cautious. I see compatible copying from GS and then editing one by one. PD. I wasn't under this impression, believe me ;-) – Juan Linares Jun 27 '17 at 14:24

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