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This question already has an answer here:

I am experiencing a strange issue with the vertical position of minipages on a page when I am using twoside. The issue is best explained using an example:

\documentclass[a4paper]{article}

\usepackage{lipsum}

\begin{document}
  \section{Heading}

  \begin{minipage}{\linewidth}
    \LARGE \lipsum[3]
  \end{minipage}

  \begin{minipage}{\linewidth}
    \LARGE \lipsum[3]
  \end{minipage}

\end{document}

When I compile this code, I get a document containing two pages. Each page contains one of the minipages and they are aligned at the top of their respective page (after the heading):

Page 1 Page 2

If I add the document class option twopage, however (\documentclass[a4paper, twoside]{article}), the first minipage suddenly is at the bottom of the first page; the second page does not change:

Page 1 using <code>twoside</code>

Interestingly, this does not happen without the \section{Heading}.

The question is obviously: how can I get the minipage to the top of the page? I am especially interested in a solution where there can be an arbitrary/unknown number of minipages on the first page (as many as fit on the page). All of them should be at the top-most possible location.

marked as duplicate by JPW, David Carlisle spacing Jun 28 '17 at 8:14

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article uses \raggedbottom by default, so if pages fall short any additional space is added at the bottom of the page. in twoside mode it defaults to \flushbottom so it tries to ensure the bottom line is at the bottom of each page but as all your text is in a minipage the only stretchy space is the space above the minipage below the heading, the second page has no stretch space so will be under-full.

As far as I understand your description you want \raggedbottom in the preamble.

Note that your first minipage is not indented due to the heading but as written your later ones will be indented and so the lines will be over-full by \parindent.

  • \raggedbottom is indeed what I want. Maybe it might be useful to point out that this is not limited to article but also to other classes (I tried book and scrarctl). – JPW Jun 28 '17 at 7:43
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    @JPW \raggedbottom is defined in the format but which is the default depends on the class "article" classes tend to default to ragged, "book" classes tend to default to flush. – David Carlisle Jun 28 '17 at 8:14

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