2

I have been creating binary and plane trees using the following code:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{tikz}  
\usetikzlibrary{positioning,chains,fit,shapes,calc}  
\begin{tikzpicture}
\node[circle,draw](z){}
  child[missing]{}
  child{
    node[circle,draw]{} child{node[circle,draw] {}} child[missing] };
\end{tikzpicture}
\end{document}

It makes very large circles on the end of the edges, and I am hoping to have smaller nodes instead, and eventually make something looking like this: enter image description here

3

The circles are large due to the inner sep of nodes. You can set it with the option inner sep=<length> (e.g. inner sep=1pt), individual for each node or for the whole picture with

\begin{tikzpicture}[inner sep=1pt]

Or you can set styles for your nodes to easily change their apperance individually, as shown here

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{tikz}  
\usetikzlibrary{positioning,chains,fit,shapes,calc}  

\begin{document}
\begin{tikzpicture}
\tikzset{dot/.style={inner sep=1pt,circle,draw,fill},
         circ/.style={inner sep=1pt,circle,draw}}
\node[dot](z){}
  child[missing]{}
  child{
    node[dot]{} child{node[circ] {}} child[missing] };
\end{tikzpicture}
\end{document}

In the example the new styles dot and circ are only availabe in the tikzpicture. If you move the two lines for\tikzset into the preamble, they are available for all pictures.

| improve this answer | |
1

If you need to draw many trees, it will be worth your while to learn Forest since it permits you to create powerful styles which you can apply to extremely concise tree specifications.

For example, defining three styles, dot tree, dot tree spread and add arrow allows us to write

\begin{forest}
  dot tree spread,
  add arrow,
  [[[][]][][[[][][]]][]]
\end{forest}
\begin{forest}
  dot tree spread,
  add arrow,
  where level=0{!1.no edge, coordinate}{
    if n=1{}{
      edge path'={(!p) -- ()},
    },
  },
  [[[][]][][[[][][]]][]]
\end{forest}
\begin{forest}
  dot tree,
  where n children=0{
    before computing xy={l*=.5, s*=.5},
    edge+={densely dashed},
  }{},
  [[[][[][]]][[][[[][]][[[][[][[][]]]][]]]]]
\end{forest}

to produce the series of three trees shown in the question:

three tree series

Complete code:

\documentclass[border=10pt]{standalone}
\usepackage{forest}
\usetikzlibrary{arrows.meta}
\begin{document}
\forestset{
  dot tree/.style={
    /tikz/>=Latex,
    for tree={
      inner sep=1pt,
      fill,
      draw,
      circle,
      calign angle=45,
      calign=fixed edge angles,
    },
    baseline,
    before computing xy={
      where n children>=4{
        tempcounta/.option=n children,
        tempdima/.option=!1.s,
        tempdimb/.option=!l.s,
        tempdimb-/.register=tempdima,
        tempdimc/.process={RRw2+P {tempcounta}{tempdimb}{##2/(##1-1)}},
        for children={
          if={>On>OR<&{n}{1}{n}{tempcounta}}{
            s/.register=tempdima,
            s+/.process={ORw2+P  {n} {tempdimc} {(##1-1)*##2} }
          }{},
        },
      }{},
    },
  },
  dot tree spread/.style={
    dot tree,
    for tree={fit=rectangle},
  },
  add arrow/.style={
    tikz+={
      \draw [thick, blue!15!gray]  (current bounding box.east) ++(2.5mm,0) edge [->] ++(10mm,0) ++(2.5mm,0) coordinate (o);
    }
  }
}
\begin{forest}
  dot tree spread,
  add arrow,
  [[[][]][][[[][][]]][]]
\end{forest}
\begin{forest}
  dot tree spread,
  add arrow,
  where level=0{!1.no edge, coordinate}{
    if n=1{}{
      edge path'={(!p) -- ()},
    },
  },
  [[[][]][][[[][][]]][]]
\end{forest}
\begin{forest}
  dot tree,
  where n children=0{
    before computing xy={l*=.5, s*=.5},
    edge+={densely dashed},
  }{},
  [[[][[][]]][[][[[][]][[[][[][[][]]]][]]]]]
\end{forest}
\end{document}
| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.