3

I am writing a paper in two column format. I have a mathematical expression like the following

$G(s)= \frac{8s^7 + 414s^6 + 5682s^5 + 34380s^4 + 12564s^3 + 22088s^2 + 185660s + 4020}{s^8+66s^7+546s^6+4436s^5+22349s^4+63484s^3  +143124s^2+104684s+4020}$

This expression is going past the first column into the second column. What should I do to take some part of the numerator and denominator in next line with alignment if possible. This is NOT enclosed within begin{equation} and end{equation} and I don't want it to be enclosed within them. It is simple mathematical expression I want something like this shown in pic here in this link 1]1

  • 1
    Wouldn't splitting the denominator across multiple lines give, at best, a confused understanding of what the denominator actually is? Maybe I am not visualizing what you have in mind. – Steven B. Segletes Jul 13 '17 at 15:41
  • 1
    Rewrite it - there's not automated way TeX can break a \fraction across lines. You could keep the fraction, but break the numerator and denominator lines each in two (say)... – Werner Jul 13 '17 at 15:42
  • The denominator is the same as given above. How to break it into 2 lines ? I want to break it into 2 lines but how should I do it ? – ShiS Jul 13 '17 at 15:43
5

You can use the splitfrac command from mathtools, which can split numerator or denominator in two lines:

\documentclass[twocolumn]{book}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage{fourier, heuristica}
\usepackage{mathtools}
\usepackage{lipsum}

\begin{document}

\lipsum[2]
\noindent$G(s)= \frac{\splitfrac{8s^7 + 414s^6 + 5682s^5 + 34380s^4 + 12564s^3 }{+ 22088s^2 + 185660s + 4020}}{\splitfrac{\rule{0pt}{1.9ex}\mathstrut s^8+66s^7+546s^6+4436s^5+22349s^4+63484s^3}{ +143124s^2+104684s+4020}}$

  \lipsum[3-6]

\end{document} 

enter image description here

2

There's no way the fraction can be split across lines, neither automatically nor manually.

Here are three proposals, but the first is quite obscure for the reader; it's much better to display such big formulas.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage{nccmath} % for \mfrac

\begin{document}

Some text some text some text some text some text some text
some text some text some text some text some text some text
$G(s)= (8s^7 + 414s^6 + 5682s^5 + 34380s^4 + 12564s^3 + 22088s^2 + 185660s + 4020)%
       (s^8+66s^7+546s^6+4436s^5+22349s^4+63484s^3  +143124s^2+104684s+4020)^{-1}$
some text some text some text some text some text some text
some text some text some text some text some text some text
\[
G(s)= 
\tfrac{8s^7 + 414s^6 + 5682s^5 + 34380s^4 + 12564s^3 + 22088s^2 + 185660s + 4020}
     {s^8+66s^7+546s^6+4436s^5+22349s^4+63484s^3  +143124s^2+104684s+4020}
\]
some text some text some text some text some text some text
some text some text some text some text some text some text
\[
G(s)= 
\mfrac{8s^7 + 414s^6 + 5682s^5 + 34380s^4 + 12564s^3 + 22088s^2 + 185660s + 4020}
     {s^8+66s^7+546s^6+4436s^5+22349s^4+63484s^3  +143124s^2+104684s+4020}
\]
some text some text some text some text some text some text
some text some text some text some text some text some text

\end{document}

enter image description here

The first method might be useful (albeit difficult to read) with two columns:

\documentclass[twocolumn]{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}

\begin{document}

Some text some text some text some text some text some text
some text some text some text some text some text some text
$G(s)= (8s^7 + 414s^6 + 5682s^5 + 34380s^4 + 12564s^3 + 22088s^2 + 185660s + 4020)%
       (s^8+66s^7+546s^6+4436s^5+22349s^4+63484s^3  +143124s^2+104684s+4020)^{-1}$
some text some text some text some text some text some text
some text some text some text some text some text some text

\end{document}

enter image description here

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