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So the question is of an aesthetics "best practice" type. I know that I shouldn't use Euler math fonts with the standard Computer Modern, and I'm struggling to find a suitable typeface where I can use Euler math without looking unprofessional.

My documents usually stay as PDFs, meaning they're never really printed on paper, rather they're looked at on screens, where the display system takes advantage of font scaling, etc.

I'd like to use one of the typefaces that come in LaTeX repositories like Texlive or MikTex, I can probably get a custom font later when I really need to.

The main problem is really finding a main font, to which Euler is a decent math companion font. I'm using XeLaTeX, if that makes any difference.

I've seen someone mentioning a set of packages which combine sets of these into entire presets, however I can't find them anymore. If someone could link me to those, that would be great, too.

  • 2
    See tex.stackexchange.com/questions/103983 (answer from Mico) for example: "[...] There is no text font that's matched perfectly to AMS Euler. [...] Other text fonts that are known to work well with AMS Euler are Palatino, Aldus, and Melior -- all are, perhaps not coincidentally, creations of Hermann Zapf, the designer of the AMS Euler fonts. To set Palatino as the text font of your document, you could, e.g., issue the command \usepackage{newpxtext}". – Dr. Manuel Kuehner Aug 14 '17 at 20:09
  • not necessarily a recommendation, but this has been addressed by knuth. he used the "concrete" version of computer modern with the euler fonts in typesetting concrete mathematics; see his tugboat article. – barbara beeton Aug 14 '17 at 21:19
  • "Concrete and Euler were used together (very successfully, I'd say) in the textbook "Concrete Mathematics" by Graham, Knuth, and Patashnik. However, be forewarned that this is a "raster font" and thus won't look very good on screen." taken from the link in my my first comment. Since the OP states that the document won't be printed, I omitted that part :) – Dr. Manuel Kuehner Aug 14 '17 at 22:13
  • Thanks guys! This already helped a ton. If any of you'd want to reformulate this into a decent answer similar to the gist of these comments, I'd accept that as an answer. – polemon Aug 15 '17 at 12:34
  • Still open questions? – Dr. Manuel Kuehner Aug 19 '17 at 8:15
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(I only quote another answer)

User Mico points out in "How do I use AMS Euler?", that

Quote 1

Concrete and Euler were used together (very successfully, I'd say) in the textbook "Concrete Mathematics" by Graham, Knuth, and Patashnik. However, be forewarned that this is a "raster font" and thus won't look very good on screen.

Quote 2

[...] There is no text font that's matched perfectly to AMS Euler. [...] Other text fonts that are known to work well with AMS Euler are Palatino, Aldus, and Melior -- all are, perhaps not coincidentally, creations of Hermann Zapf, the designer of the AMS Euler fonts. To set Palatino as the text font of your document, you could, e.g., issue the command \usepackage{newpxtext}.

Short Answer

  • If you only print your document, then try the text font Concrete (only rasterized available according to the linked answer above).
  • In all other cases try Palatino, Aldus, or Melior as the text font.
  • Al­dus and Me­lior seem to be commercial fonts.

Links

  • @Mico: I quote you. Just wanted to inform you. If you don't like it, just tell me. – Dr. Manuel Kuehner Aug 15 '17 at 18:26
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    There is an outline version of Concrete in ccfonts and an OpenType version from CMU Concrete. – Davislor Sep 4 '18 at 8:17

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