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As an observant user commented

The quote-rules depend on the country you live in, so your examples of "not like..." are not universal. In Finnish, for example, the rule is to use two closing quotation marks ”like so”.

in the thread What is the best way to use quotation mark glyphs?, where it was claimed that

and not like ''this'' or "this", because that appears like ”this” (closing quotation marks on both sides), and is very annoying to readers.

It is not only the case in Finland, but also in Sweden. The problem is that when I use our Nordic quotation style, the outcome is not as desired.

For the mini-example:

\documentclass[a4paper, twoside, swedish]{article}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{geometry}
\usepackage[swedish]{babel}
\usepackage{graphicx} % - Package for including images in the document.
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage{mathtools}
\usepackage[capitalize,swedish]{cleveref}
\usepackage{lipsum}
\begin{document}
"test"
''test''
'test'
\end{document}

I get the following outcome

Example of qoutations

which is a bit unfortunate. I would save time (and it is also a matter of principles) if I could simply write "test" and get it done.

Does anyone know what goes wrong? Why is only the second quotation mark printed when i used the "test" way of quoting?

Thanks on advance, Lars

4

You can use the csquotes package:

\documentclass[a4paper, twoside, swedish]{article}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{geometry}
\usepackage{babel}
\usepackage[autostyle]{csquotes}
\usepackage{graphicx} % - Package for including images in the document.
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage{mathtools}
\usepackage[capitalize,swedish]{cleveref}
\MakeOuterQuote{"}

\begin{document}

\enquote{test}

"test"

\end{document} 

enter image description here

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