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I have lines in a poem that run slightly longer than the margins. I'd like to force them to overset. The options I've tried (fullwidth variations), all break the verse environment and indent every new line.

\documentclass[11pt]{memoir}

\setstocksize{9in}{6in}
\settrimmedsize{9in}{6in}{*}
\settrims{0pt}{0pt}
\setlrmarginsandblock{1.2in}{1.0in}{*}
\setulmarginsandblock{1.0in}{1.5in}{*}
\setheaderspaces{*}{0.4in}{*}
\setheadfoot{0.0in}{0.75in}
\checkandfixthelayout

\begin{document}

\poemtitle*{American Naturalist \#1}
\settowidth{\versewidth}{from stained or unstained shades. So much barn we could rejoice}

\begin{verse}[\versewidth]
The American Naturalist sent me a note\\
in cursive. He said go to Century Wood Products\\
where the roads devolve from concrete into gravel, to\\
“Thirteenth Line”. He said the American elm survived\\
the first apocalypse. So much left we could sample\\
from stained or unstained shades. So much barn we could rejoice\\
at the sight of American crows perched on a pole,\\
a once northeastern tree, afield, anonymous, cold.\\
And praise the industrial cows, the industrial\\
grain, and the decrepit barns made of endangered elm.\\
Fourteen hundred dollars’ worth I ordered, and he said\\
no worries and added the goods and services tax,\\
his signature economical as a live edge.
\end{verse}

\end{document}
1

You simply can code the verse with a simple \rlap:

from stained or unstained shades. So much barn \rlap{we could rejoice}\\

enter image description here

But I have a preference for this layout:

\documentclass[11pt]{memoir}

\setstocksize{9in}{6in}
\settrimmedsize{9in}{6in}{*}
\settrims{0pt}{0pt}
\setlrmarginsandblock{1.2in}{1.0in}{*}
\setulmarginsandblock{1.0in}{1.5in}{*}
\setheaderspaces{*}{0.4in}{*}
\setheadfoot{0.0in}{0.75in}
\checkandfixthelayout

\begin{document}

\poemtitle*{American Naturalist \#1}
\settowidth{\versewidth}{grain, and the decrepit barns made of endangered elm.}
\begin{verse}[\versewidth]
The American Naturalist sent me a note\\
in cursive. He said go to Century Wood Products\\
where the roads devolve from concrete into gravel, to\\
“Thirteenth Line”. He said the American elm survived\\
the first apocalypse. So much left we could sample\\
from stained or unstained shades. So much barn \verselinebreak[ 11em][we could rejoice \\
at the sight of American crows perched on a pole,\\
a once northeastern tree, afield, anonymous, cold.\\
And praise the industrial cows, the industrial\\
grain, and the decrepit barns made of endangered elm.\\
Fourteen hundred dollars’ worth I ordered, and he said\\
no worries and added the goods and services tax,\\
his signature economical as a live edge.
\end{verse}

\end{document} 

enter image description here

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