1

I've tried to search for the symbol (Ξ) online, but everytime I find a reference to the greek Xi symbol, which looks like it but is not identical.

The following links to a page containing the special symbol:

https://github.com/ethereum/wiki/wiki/%C3%90%CE%9EVp2p-Wire-Protocol

I already have \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} in my document.

How do I make the symbol (Ξ) in LateX?

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    It is the greek capital xi, the look varies from font to font. You can look it up here: unicodelookup.com/#%CE%9E/1 – daleif Sep 6 '17 at 13:22
  • @daleif - thanks, I didn't knew that. Could you say what font I should use to get the particular instance of Xi I'm looking for? – Shuzheng Sep 6 '17 at 13:25
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    In general, you would use $\Xi$ if you just wanted the lone symbol inline in your document. If it is part of a longer equation (which is already in math mode), then using \Xi is sufficient. – Steven B. Segletes Sep 6 '17 at 13:28
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    We can not know the instance you are looking for, it depends on the fonts we use to read your question, I see two quite different looking versions in the title and body (but in general you should just use your document font and accept whatever shape Xi that is) but the serif and sans serif version in your question look like this – David Carlisle Sep 6 '17 at 13:36
  • You've tagged this with fontspec, so perhaps \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \begin {document} Ξ \end{document} (compile with xelatex or lualatex of course). – Torbjørn T. Sep 6 '17 at 13:46
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Like this?

$\mathsf{\Xi}$

enter image description here

You also may use the sans-serif text fonts TeX Gyre Adventor or TeX Gyre Heros, which have the Greek glyphs.

  • Indeed, like that! :D – Shuzheng Sep 6 '17 at 14:18
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Here is one way:

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{textgreek}

\begin{document}

\textXi

\end{document}
  • I think (although not sure) that the OP is looking for the character in a sans serif font. e.g., {\sffamily\textXi}. – David Purton Sep 6 '17 at 13:34
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    Please do post a picture of the output to supplement your answer. – Troy Sep 6 '17 at 15:25

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