1

From biblatex's documentation, p. 94: \cite and \Cite print the citation without any additions such as parentheses.

Then why does the following code print "[1]."?

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{biblatex}

\begin{filecontents}{\jobname.bib}
@misc{A01,
  author = {Author, A.},
  year = {2001},
  title = {Alpha},
}
\end{filecontents}

\addbibresource{\jobname.bib}

\begin{document}
\cite{A01}.
\end{document}

(Biblatex: cite command to create numeric citation without parentheses? provides a solution, but I'm looking for the reason of this behaviour. Is it misconfiguration?)

  • with numeric citation styles the destinction between \cite and \parencite doesn't make much sense, so \cite does "the normal thing", which means brackets. – Ulrike Fischer Sep 10 '17 at 16:45
  • 1
    "These are the bare citation commands. They print the citation without any additions such as parentheses. The numeric and alphabetic styles still wrap the label in square brackets since the reference may be ambiguous otherwise." – Torbjørn T. Sep 10 '17 at 16:50
  • Sorry, didn't know I was actually using the numeric style.. – Arch Stanton Sep 10 '17 at 16:59
  • 2
    Numeric is the default (like plain style for bibtex). – Bernard Sep 10 '17 at 17:54
2

The default style is numeric, and to quote a little bit more from the manual:

These are the bare citation commands. They print the citation without any additions such as parentheses. The numeric and alphabetic styles still wrap the label in square brackets since the reference may be ambiguous otherwise

(Emphasis mine.)

Hence, that output is to expected, and by design.

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