5

I am looking for a second set of alphabets for my article.

I have seen this post which looks great but it does not cover small letters (only capitals).

\mathfrak is a good option too, except for a very ugly and ambiguous x letter:

mathfrak

I am wondering if there is another alternative which covers small letters.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{amsmath,amssymb}
\usepackage{yfonts}

\begin{document}
\begin{align}
&\mathfrak{abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz} \\
&\mathfrak{ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ} 
\end{align}
\end{document}

The font should be different enough to be distinguished from normal default font but readable enough so no ambiguity happens.

8
  • The ol' \mathfrak x: tex.stackexchange.com/questions/320403/…. That answer has thirty-leven fonts you don't want. Oct 30, 2017 at 1:24
  • @StevenB.Segletes, all look the same. Cannot use them for an academic paper.
    – ar2015
    Oct 30, 2017 at 1:26
  • Looking through my font library for more conventional "x"es: FRAKTUR: wieynkfraktur, schmalfettefraktur, Luftwaffe, Frankenstein, Fraktur, kabinettfraktur. BASTARDA: kanzlei, worn manuscript, yonkers, belwe gotisch, cimbrian, lucida black, washington text. ROTUNDA: Boer Tudor, Goudy Medieval, Augusta, typographer rotunda, Goudy Thirty, Weiss Rundgotisch, Alpine. TEXTURA: Werbedeutsch heavy, Frederick text, blackwood castle, Harrowgate, Lohengrin, Progressive Text, Old English Five, Canterbury, Old English, Iglesia, Diploma, Cloister Black, Old London, headline text, English towne, ... Oct 30, 2017 at 1:45
  • @StevenB.Segletes, Many thanks but I dont know how to use for example wieynkfraktur. I use \wieynkfraktur but it is not a recognized command.
    – ar2015
    Oct 30, 2017 at 4:58
  • These are not packages I mentioned, but fonts. If you find and download the font from the internet, and use xelatex or lualatex, you can access the glyphs. Then, additional configuration will be required to use it in math mode. For example, 1001fonts.com/wieynk-fraktur-font.html Oct 30, 2017 at 10:17

2 Answers 2

1

This is compiled in LuaLaTeX. I can use \setmathfont with the range specifier to limit the extent of the font substitution. Here, I set the math font to Old English Text MT found by default on Windows systems, but limit it to the range of \mathfrak. In essence, it substitutes only for \mathfrak, until the \setmathfont is used to later reset the feature to the Latin Modern Math defaults.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{fontspec,unicode-math}
\setmathfont{Latin Modern Math}
\begin{document}
\setmathfont[range=\mathfrak]{Old English Text MT}
Here we have $\mathfrak{x}^{55}+1 \ne(x^5)^{11}+1$

$\mathfrak{ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ}$

$\mathfrak{abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz}$

\hrulefill

\setmathfont{Latin Modern Math}
Here we have $\mathfrak{x}^{55}+1 \ne(x^5)^{11}+1$

$\mathfrak{ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ}$

$\mathfrak{abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz}$
\end{document}

enter image description here


Alternately, if the new fraktur font replacement is already available for pdflatex, then an approach like this can be used (based on the answer at Is it possible to use the DeclareFontShape command with kpfonts?):

\documentclass{article}
%\usepackage{fourier}
\DeclareFontFamily{U}{jkpmia}{}
\DeclareFontShape{U}{jkpmia}{m}{it}{<->s*jkpmia}{}
\DeclareFontShape{U}{jkpmia}{bx}{it}{<->s*jkpbmia}{}
\DeclareMathAlphabet{\mathfrak}{U}{jkpmia}{m}{it}
\SetMathAlphabet{\mathfrak}{bold}{U}{jkpmia}{bx}{it}
\begin{document}
Here we have $\mathfrak{x}^{55}+1 \ne(x^5)^{11}+1$

$\mathfrak{ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ}$

$\mathfrak{abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz}$
\end{document}

enter image description here

4

Here are some freely available fonts included in TeX Live. But Fraktur is inherently ambiguous, see C, E and G, for instance or A and U.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsfonts}

\newcommand{\alphabet}{abcdefghijklmnopqrs\/tuvwxyz}
\newcommand{\Alphabet}{ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ}

\DeclareMathAlphabet{\mathpgoth}{OT1}{pgoth}{m}{n}
\DeclareMathAlphabet{\mathesstixfrak}{U}{esstixfrak}{m}{n}
\DeclareMathAlphabet{\mathboondoxfrak}{U}{BOONDOX-frak}{m}{n}

\begin{document}

\subsubsection*{amsfonts}
$\mathfrak{\alphabet}$\\
$\mathfrak{\Alphabet}$

\subsubsection*{pgoth}
$\mathpgoth{\alphabet}$\\
$\mathpgoth{\Alphabet}$

\subsubsection*{esstixfrak}
$\mathesstixfrak{\alphabet}$\\
$\mathesstixfrak{\Alphabet}$

\subsubsection*{boondox-frak}
$\mathboondoxfrak{\alphabet}$\\
$\mathboondoxfrak{\Alphabet}$

\end{document}

The \/ is in order to avoid ligatures.

enter image description here

1
  • where can I find a list of such fonts? I'm trying to use lucida or mma frak (it appears alongside esstixfrak and BOONDOX-frak in this list tex.stackexchange.com/questions/58098/…) but when I use your \DeclareMathAlphabet command for {lucida} instead for example it doesn't work.
    – D.R
    Oct 27, 2021 at 0:07

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