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When using the \mathbf command instead of \boldsymbol, greek symbols are not always made bold. However, when using the tufte-book document class, the beta symbol is changed into fi. What is fi and why does this happen?

\documentclass[]{tufte-book}
\begin{document}

\[\beta\]
\[\mathbf{\beta}\]

\end{document}

Yields: enter image description here

\boldsymbol does appear to work correctly, but where does this unrelated fi come from?

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1 Answer 1

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That is an oddity of the mathpazo font package. For greek letters (OML encoding) you have to use \mathbold, because \mathbf switches to OT1 encoding.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{mathpazo}
\begin{document}

\[b\beta\]
\[\mathbf{b\beta}\]
\[\mathbold{b\beta}\]

\end{document}

enter image description here

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  • 1
    what about just using the bm package? Easier to type
    – daleif
    Nov 1, 2017 at 8:57

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