1

In plain Latex document, we can use simple command \boldsymbol{\mathrm{\Phi or q}} to obtain upright Greek or Roman letter that will look fine.

\documentclass[12pt,a4paper]{report}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage{amsmath, amssymb, amsfonts, bm}
\usepackage{upgreek} % To compare with \boldsymbol{\mathrm{\Phi}}
\begin{document}
$\boldsymbol{\mathrm{\Phi}}$ or $\boldsymbol{\mathrm{q}}$
$\boldsymbol{\Upphi}, \bm{\Upphi}$ % To compare with \boldsymbol{\mathrm{\Phi}}
\end{document}

A huge problem arises when one wants to use one of the multiple templates and SVMult is one of them. There is \vec{q} command that works for Roman letters, but as far as Greek letters are concerned, I get one of the following results:

  • \boldsymbol{\mathrm{\Phi}} or \bm{\mathrm{\Phi}} - the font is not italic, however, it's not bold either.
  • \boldsymbol{\Phi} or \bm{\Phi} - the font is bold, however, it's italic.
  • \mathbf{\Phi} or \vec{\Phi} - yields just a black square.

I have the following questions concerned with this issue:

  1. What are other (better - see remark 1) ways to obtain upright bold Greek letters with SVMult package.

  2. Why on earth so many templates and classes create such issue with bold upright letters in math mode?


Remarks:

  1. There is a possibility of introducing upgreek package, but here I am switching to the new template with a prepared article, and this would require changing the name of Greek letters in the whole document (which is not the idea of Latex, is it? ). Moreover, fonts produced this way look much worse.

  2. I looked into similar problems. Most questions referred to How can I get bold math symbols?, or this question but I couldn't find an answer to my problem.

  3. SVMult is a Springer template for academic articles and can be downloaded from this site or directly from this link.

1

The upright Greek letters are available with the var prefix.

\documentclass[12pt,a4paper,vecarrow]{svmult}
\usepackage{amsmath,amssymb,bm}

% see https://tex.stackexchange.com/questions/78083/
\renewcommand{\vec}[1]{\mathbf{#1}} 

\begin{document}

\verb|\bm{\varPhi}|: $\bm{\varPhi}$ and $\varPhi$

\end{document}

enter image description here

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