2

Anybody knows how to make this long equation look neat in LaTeX? Many thanks!

enter image description here

\documentclass[12pt]{article}

\begin{document}
\begin{equation} 
t_p= \left\{ \begin{array}{ll} 
1 & D=0 \\ 
1-(Credit_{fed}^L+Credit_{provin}^L) & 0<D\leq 200 \\ 
200*[1-(Credit_{fed}^L+Credit_{provin}^L)]
+(D-200)*[1-(Credit_{fed}^H+Credit_{provin}^H)] & D>200 
\end{array} \right. 
\end{equation} 
\end{document} 
4
  • 1
    Welcome to Maths SX! Could you post a full compilable code, as a starting point?
    – Bernard
    Nov 29, 2017 at 0:05
  • 4
    Start by using “C” instead of “Credit”.
    – egreg
    Nov 29, 2017 at 0:07
  • 1
    You should edit your question and insert this code therein. B.t.w. what are your document class, paper format, font size, &c.?
    – Bernard
    Nov 29, 2017 at 0:20
  • \documentclass[12pt]{article}
    – user149250
    Nov 29, 2017 at 0:23

5 Answers 5

3

If you want the variable names Credit, fed and provin to be in italics, use \mathit{Credit}, etc. Or \mathrm{Credit} for Roman.

Since you have a complicated repeated expression, I suggest you define a function C(K) to simplify your definition of t_p. I use the cases environment from the amsmath package.

enter image description here

Here is the code:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}

\begin{document}
Let $C(K)=\mathit{Credit}_{\mathit{fed}}^K+\mathit{Credit}_{\mathit{provin}}^K$. Then
\begin{equation}
t_p=\begin{cases}
    1 & D=0 \\ 
    1-C(L) & 0<D\leq 200 \\ 
    200\big(1-C(L)\big)+(D-200)\big(1-C(H)\big) & D>200 
\end{cases}
\end{equation}
\end{document}
1
  • It may seem strange, but we typically do not use comments for offering thanks. The way to show appreciation is by up-voting the answer or answers that you think are helpful. An answer that you feel best addresses your question should be "accepted". More information can be found here.
    – Sandy G
    Dec 4, 2017 at 15:30
1

Something like this?

enter image description here

Observe the use of "roman", i.e., upright, lettering for the variable names 'Credit', 'fed', and 'provin'.

\documentclass[12pt]{article}
\newcommand\vn[1]{\mathrm{#1}} % "variable name"
\usepackage{mathtools} % for "dcases" environment
\begin{document}

\begin{equation} 
t_p= \begin{dcases} 
  1 & D=0 \\[1ex]
  1-(\vn{Credit}_{\vn{fed}}^L+\vn{Credit}_{\vn{provin}}^L) & 0<D\leq 200 \\[1ex]
  \begin{array}[b]{@{}r@{}}
200\phantom{)}[1-(\vn{Credit}_{\vn{fed}}^L+\vn{Credit}_{\vn{provin}}^L)]\\[1ex]
  {}+(D-200)[1-(\vn{Credi‌​t}_{\vn{fed}}^H+\vn{Credit}_{\vn{pr‌ovin}}^H)] 
  \end{array} & D>200 
\end{dcases}
\end{equation} 
\end{document}
1

I propose this non-standard layout, with some shortcuts, based o, the empheq package and the alignedat environment:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[showframe]{geometry}
\usepackage{empheq}
\newcommand{\credit}{\mathrm{Credit}}
\newcommand{\fed}{\mathrm{fed}}
\newcommand{\provin}{\mathrm{provin}}

\begin{document}

\begin{empheq}[left = {t_p = \empheqlbrace}]{equation}
  \begin{alignedat}{4}
    & 1 &\hspace{1.5em}\text{if }&D=0, &\hspace{4em} &
    1-\bigl(\mathrm{Credit}_\mathrm{fed}^L + \mathrm{Credit}_\mathrm{provin}^L\bigr) &\qquad\text{if } & 0 <D\leq 200, \\[1.5ex] %
    & \mathrlap{\begin{aligned}[b] 200*\bigl[1&-\bigl(\credit_{\fed} ^L + \credit_{\provin}^L\bigr)\bigr] \\& + (D-200)*[1-\bigl(\credit_{\fed}^H + \credit_{\provin}^H\bigl)\bigr]\end{aligned}} & & & & & \quad\text{if } & D>200.
  \end{alignedat}
\end{empheq}

\end{document} 

enter image description here

1

Suggestion: use substitution and definition.

E.g. the two terms with C..L and C..H are structurally identical and only differ by index L and H. Define e.g. S^(x):=C_fed^(x)+C_provin^(x) with X = H or L, in some nice way.

Substitute this term in your 3 cases and it will have a much better look and feel.

1
  • In principle I agree, but on this site we tend to provide concrete answers presenting some working code (and possibly a snapshot of the output).
    – campa
    Jul 6, 2021 at 12:09
0

Referencing answer How do I make this long equation look neat? I'd slightly rearrange it, which hopefully removes some back and forth, i.e. "understand without thinking about it":

rearranged proposal

Code:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}

\begin{document}
    Let $C(K)=\mathit{Credit}_{\mathit{fed}}^K+ \mathit{Credit}_{\mathit{provin}}^K$. Then
    \begin{equation}
        t_p=\begin{cases}
            1 & D=0 \\ 
            (1-C(L)) & 200 \geq D>0 \\ 
            \big(1-C(L)\big) 200 +(D-200)\big(1-C(H)\big) & D>200 
        \end{cases}
    \end{equation}
\end{document}

Rational:

  • grouping shows progressive changes
  • reading direction for the ranges of D are always the same (i.e. larger values to the left in this case)
  • get what's relevant without thinking too much about it (so you can focus on more relevant things than just deciphering ;-) )

Remark: the last two terms in braces should be interchanged to follow the same logic ...

like this

BTW: Somebody lost dividing by D in the last case ...

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .