2

I would like to use the minimum operator in latex, with the subscript directly below the minimum operator but without having the superscript directly above the minimum operator. Right now I got

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{mathtools}
\begin{document}
\[\min^{+}_{j \in \mathcal{A}^{C}}\]
\end{document}

Which results in

Result ,whereas I would like to end up having enter image description here

Does anyone know how to do this? Any help would be greatly appreciated.

  • 3
    {\min_{...}}^+ – David Carlisle Jan 15 '18 at 19:23
  • "Which results in" that is not the output I get on my end. WHen I compiled you code, I get this !Mathematica graphics How did you get the output above? – Nasser Jan 15 '18 at 19:28
  • @Nasser, I have no idea how my output can be different than yours, but David's comment helped me get the desired output :) – Nordin Jan 15 '18 at 19:30
  • @Nasser is correct that the posted image is not generated by the posted code (Nordin you should fix that) the image shows display math so \[..\] not $...$ – David Carlisle Jan 15 '18 at 19:32
  • "I have no idea how my output can be different than yours" I also have no idea. – Nasser Jan 15 '18 at 19:38
1

One of these three perhaps

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{mathtools}
\begin{document}
\[
{\min_{j \in \mathcal{A}^{C}}}^{+}
\quad
\mathop{{\min}^{+}}_{j \in \mathcal{A}^{C}}
\quad
{\min_{\mathclap{j \in \mathcal{A}^{C}}}}^{+}
\]
\end{document}

The first places a + on a mathord constructed from min and the subscript (note the construct will then be a mathord in relation to any following terms, which may or may not be the spacing that you want)

The second is a mathop constructed from min+ so gets the limits spacing for the subscript, and mathop space for any following terms. Note that unlike the other two, this one centres the subscript on min+ not on min.

The third is like the first but hides the width of the subscript which gives tighter spacing for the + (but fir very large subscripts has the danger that it may over-print adjacent terms with no warning.

| improve this answer | |
  • In Exercise 18.44 of The TeXbook Knuth endorses the second solution, and shows how to center the subscript on \min instead of on {\min}^{+} (the code should adapted to LaTeX, of course). – GuM Jan 15 '18 at 22:01

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