7

Community, this question does not hold up to my standard research quality. Please excuse if there is an obvious answer. It's a bit of a deadline situation with a late change in requirements.

I have a beamer document that is compiled with LuaTeX. I have to use a system font (ttf). In the MWE below I use Consolas font as a replacement for my actual font (it is commercial).

I want to use a "normal" sans serif math font (via \usepackage{}) together with the ttf font. I use \usepackage{isomath} in my MWE.

The document compiles but the math is not all sans serif (numbers, sin, alpha, \infty are serif). I want everything to be sans serif.

\documentclass{beamer}
\usepackage{fontspec}
\usepackage{mathtools}
%\setsansfont{PorscheNextTT}
\setsansfont{Consolas} % Should be available on a Windows system
\usepackage{isomath}

\begin{document}

\begin{frame}
Testtext. Testtext. \textbf{Testtext.} Testtext. \textcolor{red}{Testtext.}

\begin{align}
1 + 2 &= x\\
y(t) &= \int_0^\infty \sin(\alpha) d\text{t}
\end{align}

Testtext. Testtext. \textbf{Testtext.} Testtext. \textcolor{red}{Testtext.}
\end{frame}

\end{document}

MWE with #Consolas# font

enter image description here

MWE with my #actual# font

enter image description here



Final Solution After Reading the Answers

\documentclass{beamer}
\usefonttheme{professionalfonts}

% Nice sans serif font
% Loads arevtext and arevmath which is not necessary in this case (arevmath would be enough)
\usepackage{arev}

% Here the magic happens
\usepackage[no-math]{fontspec}

% Never without...
\usepackage{mathtools}

% My system font for the main text
%\setsansfont{PorscheNextTT}
\setsansfont{Consolas}

% Should be the Last Font package
% Uses letters and numbers from the main font for math --> very useful
\usepackage[italic]{mathastext}

\begin{document}

\begin{frame}
Testtext. Testtext. \textbf{Testtext.} Testtext. \textcolor{red}{Testtext.}

\begin{align}
1 + 2 &= x\\
y(t) &= \int_0^\infty \sin(\alpha) \mathrm{d}t
\end{align}

Testtext. Testtext. \textbf{Testtext.} Testtext. \textcolor{red}{Testtext.}
\end{frame}

\end{document}

enter image description here

With my Actual Font enter image description here

9
  • 1
    Have you already tried unicode-math and its \setmathfont? It has options to appear ISO-like.
    – TeXnician
    Commented Jan 18, 2018 at 20:11
  • 1
    I don't think there exists a sans serif math font in OpenType format. The closest you can probably get is TeX Gyre DejaVu Math (showcase) which is slab serif. Otherwise I know there exists cmbright which is a Type1 sans serif math font. Alternatively you could use mathastext to use letters and numerals of the text font in math. Commented Jan 18, 2018 at 20:17
  • 1
    If your actual text font and the math font look similar enough, maybe \usepackage[no-math]{fontspec} could be used? Commented Jan 18, 2018 at 20:20
  • @TeXnician No, I did not try that. I do not have much experience with that kind of problem at all (as you can tell :). Commented Jan 18, 2018 at 20:22
  • 1
    The symbols from arev look nice, however a little bit too big in comparison to the surrounding font. If this is still true for your real font tex.stackexchange.com/a/249379/36296 could be helpful. Commented Jan 18, 2018 at 21:45

3 Answers 3

8

I think your best bet is mathastext.

\documentclass{beamer}
\usepackage[no-math]{fontspec}
\setsansfont[Scale=0.9]{DejaVu Sans Mono} % no MS Windows, sorry
\usepackage[italic]{mathastext}
\usepackage{mathtools}
\usepackage{isomath}
\newcommand*\diff{\mathop{}\!\mathrm{d}}

\begin{document}

\begin{frame}
  Testtext. Testtext. \textbf{Testtext.} Testtext. \textcolor{red}{Testtext.}

  \begin{align}
    1 + 2 &= x\\
    y(t) &= \int_0^\infty \sin(\alpha) \diff t
  \end{align}

  Testtext. Testtext. \textbf{Testtext.} Testtext. \textcolor{red}{Testtext.}
\end{frame}

\end{document}

enter image description here

3
  • Just making (actually burning) dinner. I will look into it later. Thanks so far....1 min later...tried it...looks great! Commented Jan 18, 2018 at 20:25
  • Thanks for the answer. And I really appreciate your effort with \newcommand*\diff{\mathop{}\!\mathrm{d}} (which I did very wrong in my MWE). Commented Jan 18, 2018 at 21:09
  • Just read the documentation of the mathastext package. This seems to be a very useful package for the/my future. Commented Jan 18, 2018 at 21:16
6

Usually, I use arevmath for sans-serif math in beamer. Also, parts of the iwona fonts are helpful (for sans-serif integrals, for example, though big parentheses look a bit weird in this setup).

\documentclass[professionalfont]{beamer}
\usepackage{mathtools}
\usepackage{arevmath}
\SetSymbolFont{largesymbols}{normal}{OMX}{iwona}{m}{n}
\usepackage{fontspec}
%\setsansfont{PorscheNextTT}
%\setsansfont{Consolas} % Should be available on a Windows system
\setsansfont{Fira Sans} % I'm not on Windows, so Fira Sans instead

\begin{document}

\begin{frame}
Testtext. Testtext. \textbf{Testtext.} Testtext. \textcolor{red}{Testtext.}

\begin{align}
1 + 2 &= x\\
y(t) &= \int_0^\infty \sin(\alpha) d\text{t}
\end{align}

Testtext. Testtext. \textbf{Testtext.} Testtext. \textcolor{red}{Testtext.}
\end{frame}

\end{document}

The result:

enter image description here

1
  • 1
    Thanks for the recommendation of arevmath - I will use this. Very good readability. Commented Jan 18, 2018 at 21:18
3

As a quick hack, you could use your text font for the "normal" letters in math using the no-math option of fontspec. For all symbols which are not part of your font, the default sans serif ones of beamer will be used.

% !TeX TS-program = lualatex
\documentclass{beamer}
\usepackage[no-math]{fontspec}
\usepackage{mathtools}
%\setsansfont{PorscheNextTT}
\setsansfont{Consolas} % Should be available on a Windows system

\begin{document}

\begin{frame}
Testtext. Testtext. \textbf{Testtext.} Testtext. \textcolor{red}{Testtext.}

\begin{align}
1 + 2 &= x\\
y(t) &= \int_0^\infty \sin(\alpha) d\text{t}
\end{align}

Testtext. Testtext. \textbf{Testtext.} Testtext. \textcolor{red}{Testtext.}
\end{frame}

\end{document}

enter image description here

1
  • Thanks for the answer. The no-math did the trick. Commented Jan 18, 2018 at 21:08

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