4

Unicode character U+15D0 is found to be an ancient form to represent the value 50, later on associated to "L" in the Roman system, something like \|/.

I am preparing a historical text about numbers and would like to insert this character to adorn it, but I cannot find an equivalent to compile with (xe)Latex.

Somebody has an idea?

  • 2
    Do you have a font containing this character? – Earthliŋ Jan 19 '18 at 19:19
  • Well, it's definitely not U+15D0 anyway. The Wikipedia article abuses it. – egreg Jan 19 '18 at 22:02
  • The concept of Unicode is that each particular code location, other than private and corporate use, "means something" regardless of what the glyph looks like. In a printed (to paper) document, the only thing that counts is appearance. But in an E-document, U+15D0 has a specific meaning, which is unrelated to ancient 50. – user139954 Jan 19 '18 at 22:29
  • is this related to 𐅢 (U+10162 which is some form of 10) perhaps you would prefer a rotated version of that? – David Carlisle Jan 19 '18 at 22:43
  • @Earthliŋ, in the very moment of asking the question, no... @egreg, @RobtAll and @David Carlisle, I understand your points. While referring to 50, I was quoting a meaning I have read in Wikipedia regarding the history of Roman numerals here to merely introduce my question. Yet regarding unicode labels, names or definitions, I really don't know the details behind. :) Sorry if I caused dubiety between a "historical" link of the glyph and a "computational" meaning of the unicode per se. I wanted to reproduce the character as imitated. – opcg Jan 19 '18 at 23:40
7
\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{stackengine}
\newcommand\altL{\stackengine{0pt}{\sffamily V}{\sffamily I}{O}{c}{F}{F}{L}}
\begin{document}
Do yov have change for a \altL?
\end{document}

enter image description here

5
\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{fontspec}

\setmainfont{Gadugi}

\begin{document}

 ᗐ 15D0 is CANADIAN SYLLABICS CARRIER WU
\end{document}

enter image description here

If you have a font with the character (here I used Gadugi as that is the font my browser used when I started to type this answer) then you can use the font with xelatex or (as in the above image) lualatex.

  • I don't have it, but will do it. Great! This is it! Thank you! :) – opcg Jan 19 '18 at 23:41
  • @opcg this answers the question in the title of how to typeset U+1D50, note the other comments though, this is a Canadian Syllabics symbol, so a long way from Rome. – David Carlisle Jan 19 '18 at 23:44
  • Alright, @David Carlisle! Regarding Rome, I tried to explain the reason in the comment above. I was aware of the Canadian Syllabics through the link in the question. Perhaps Wikipedia's text is not so cool concerning the symbol use as egreg has pointed out. Not sure, though... I will investigate a bit more. – opcg Jan 19 '18 at 23:59
2

Here is an option using ooalign. Note the need for \ after the macro if you want a trailing space.

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}

\newcommand{\ancient}{\ooalign{\textsf V\cr\hidewidth\textsf I\hidewidth\cr}}

\begin{document}

The symbol \ancient\ once meant 50.

\end{document}
0

Two versions with picture mode.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{pict2e}

\newcommand{\ancientLround}{%
  \begingroup
  \settoheight{\unitlength}{V}%
  \begin{picture}(1.2,1)
  \roundjoin\roundcap
  \linethickness{0.6pt}
  \polyline(0.1,1)(0.6,0)(0.6,1)(0.6,0)(1.1,1)
  \end{picture}%
  \endgroup
}
\newcommand{\ancientL}{%
  \begingroup
  \settoheight{\unitlength}{V}%
  \begin{picture}(1.2,1)
  \roundjoin
  \linethickness{0.6pt}
  \polyline(0.1,0.97)(0.6,0)(0.6,1)
  \polyline(0.6,1)(0.6,0)(1.1,0.97)
  \end{picture}%
  \endgroup
}

\begin{document}

Here is \ancientL{} (a Roman numeral).

Here is \ancientLround{} (a Roman numeral).

\end{document}

enter image description here

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