1

I am looking for inspirations how I should layout »dual content« as seen in the picture below:

Two columns for dual statements

This is currently solved by multicols and manual column breaks, the math environments are just coded by \textbf{Theorem 2.1.9\textsuperscript{op}}\textit{…} , which is really not nice.

Are there better ways to implement this? And is it, after all, a good idea to layout dual content in this way? Or should I try to place the content on two opposite pages? If so, are there good possibilities to do this?

Thank you!


A minimal working example:

\documentclass{paper}
\usepackage{multicol}
\usepackage{lipsum}

\begin{document}

\begin{multicols}{2}
  \noindent \textbf{Theorem 2.1.9} (Comparison Theorem)\textbf{.} \textit{\lipsum[1]}
  ~\\
  \noindent \textbf{Theorem 2.1.9\textsuperscript{op}} (Comparison Theorem)\textbf{.} \textit{\lipsum[1]}
\end{multicols}

\end{document}
  • Could you please add your code (a MWE)? – bmv Jan 24 '18 at 14:38
2

You could use minipages, but the net result is the same. One difference is that minpages cannot be broken across page boundaries. Then again, you really don't want to do that with multicol either. paracol could handle that.

\documentclass{paper}
%\usepackage{multicol}
\usepackage{lipsum}

\begin{document}

\noindent
\begin{minipage}{\dimexpr 0.5\textwidth-0.5\columnsep}
  \textbf{Theorem 2.1.9} (Comparison Theorem)\textbf{.} \textit{\lipsum[1]}
\end{minipage}\hfill
\begin{minipage}{\dimexpr 0.5\textwidth-0.5\columnsep}
  \noindent \textbf{Theorem 2.1.9\textsuperscript{op}} (Comparison Theorem)\textbf{.} \textit{\lipsum[1]}
\end{minipage}

\end{document}

Here is a paracol version.

\documentclass{paper}
\usepackage{paracol}
\usepackage{lipsum}

\begin{document}

\begin{paracol}{2}
  \sloppy% SOP for narrow columns
  \noindent \textbf{Theorem 2.1.9} (Comparison Theorem)\textbf{.} \textit{\lipsum[1]}
\switchcolumn
  \noindent \textbf{Theorem 2.1.9\textsuperscript{op}} (Comparison Theorem)\textbf{.} \textit{\lipsum[1]}
\end{paracol}

\end{document}
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